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Environmental fate & pathways

Field studies

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
field studies
Type of information:
other: Applicant's summary entry of further references
Adequacy of study:
other information
Reliability:
other: Applicant's summary entry of further references
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Applicant's summary entry of further references

Data source

Referenceopen allclose all

Reference Type:
review article or handbook
Title:
SIDS Initial Assessment Report For SIAM 13 (Bern, 6 - 9 November 2001) - 1,2-Dichlorobenzene
Author:
OECD
Year:
2001
Bibliographic source:
UNEP Publications
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Chlorobenzenes in field soil with a history of multiple sewage sludge applications
Author:
Wang M, McGrath S, Jones K
Year:
1995
Bibliographic source:
Environmental Science and Technology, 29(2): 356- 362

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
Applicant's summary entry of further references; endpoint study record was created to contribute to the overall results.
GLP compliance:
not specified

Test material

Constituent 1
Chemical structure
Reference substance name:
1,2-dichlorobenzene
EC Number:
202-425-9
EC Name:
1,2-dichlorobenzene
Cas Number:
95-50-1
Molecular formula:
C6H4Cl2
IUPAC Name:
1,2-dichlorobenzene

Results and discussion

Any other information on results incl. tables

Applicant's summary entry of further references; endpoint study record was created to contribute to the overall results:

In this summary entry, a further publication on the degradation of o-dichlorobenzene in field soil is summarized. The reliability of this publication was not assignable because references were only cited as secondary literature.

In a study of 8 archived samples of sewage sludge amended soil collected between 1942 and 1991, Wang et al (1995) compared them to soil from a control plot that had never been treated with either sewage sludge or other organic manures. It was found that the level of chlorobenzene compounds (including 1,2-dichlorobenzene) in the sludge amended samples was elevated over those of the control. The range of 1,2-dichlorobenzene applied in the sewage sludge was not detected to 126 µg/kg, however during the 50 years the residue of 1,2-dichlorobenzene was found to be the lowest of the dichlorobenzene compounds at 6-9%. This result supports the relatively rapid elimination of 1,2-dichlorobenzene from soils. Volatilisation was identified by microcosm as the main mechanism of loss.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Executive summary:

In this summary entry, a further publication on the degradation of o-dichlorobenzene in field soil is summarized. The reliability of this publication was not assignable because references were only cited as secondary literature.

In a study of 8 archived samples of sewage sludge amended soil collected between 1942 and 1991, Wang et al (1995) compared them to soil from a control plot that had never been treated with either sewage sludge or other organic manures. It was found that the level of chlorobenzene compounds (including 1,2-dichlorobenzene) in the sludge amended samples was elevated over those of the control. The range of 1,2-dichlorobenzene applied in the sewage sludge was not detected to 126 µg/kg, however during the 50 years the residue of 1,2-dichlorobenzene was found to be the lowest of the dichlorobenzene compounds at 6-9%. This result supports the relatively rapid elimination of 1,2-dichlorobenzene from soils. Volatilisation was identified by microcosm as the main mechanism of loss.