Registration Dossier

Diss Factsheets

Administrative data

Hazard for aquatic organisms

Freshwater

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Marine water

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

STP

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Sediment (freshwater)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Sediment (marine water)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for air

Air

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Soil

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for predators

Secondary poisoning

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no potential for bioaccumulation

Additional information

Calcium lactate fully dissociates into Ca2+ ions and lactate, is readily biodegradable, does not bioaccumulate and has low potential for adsorption to sediment and soil.

The ecotoxicology of calcium lactate can be understood in terms of the ecotoxicology of calcium chloride and lactic acid

(for further information the reader is referred to the read across statement attached in section 13 of the current IUCLID5 file)

No adverse effects of calcium chloride have been observed in the acute aquatic toxicity studies with fish, daphnids and algae at the highest recommended test concentrations of 100 mg/L. For lactic acid, no adverse effects have been observed in the acute aquatic toxicity studies with daphnids and algae at the highest recommended test concentrations of 100 mg/L; for fish slight effects observed for lactic acid at concentrations of 100 mg/L are considered not relevant since all observed effects are due to the low pH induced by high concentrations of lactic acid (pH<5 at 100 mg/L), and will completely disappear at lower concentrations. Calcium lactate does not lower the pH of test water and therefore it is concluded that no adverse effects of calcium lactate will occur at the highest recommended test concentration of 100 mg/L.

No hazard has been identified and derivation of PNECs is not considered to be necessary.

Conclusion on classification

Calcium lactate fully dissociates into Ca2+ ions and lactate, is readily biodegradable, does not bioaccumulate and has low potential for adsorption to sediment and soil.

The ecotoxicology of calcium lactate can be understood in terms of the ecotoxicology of calcium chloride and lactic acid. No adverse effects of calcium chloride have been observed in the acute aquatic toxicity studies with fish, daphnids and algae at the highest recommended test concentrations of 100 mg/L. For lactic acid, no adverse effects have been observed in the acute aquatic toxicity studies with daphnids and algae at the highest recommended test concentrations of 100 mg/L; for fish slight effects observed for lactic acid at concentrations of 100 mg/L are considered not relevant since all observed effects are due to the low pH induced by high concentrations of lactic acid (pH<5 at 100 mg/L), and will completely disappear at lower concentrations. Calcium lactate does not lower the pH of test water and therefore it is concluded that no adverse effects of calcium lactate will occur at the highest recommended test concentration of 100 mg/L. No hazard has been identified and derivation of a PNEC is not considered necessary.

Calcium lactate is not classified for environmental hazards.