Registration Dossier

Ecotoxicological information

Endpoint summary

Administrative data

Description of key information

Additional information

Acute toxicity to fish:

In an OECD 203 study, conducted to GLP, based on the mean measured test concentrations of the centrifuged test media the acute toxicity of the test material to rainbow trout, methylene bis(dibutyldithiocarbamate) gave a 96-Hour LC50 value of greater than 0.060 mg /L. The NOEC was 0.060 mg/L (Safepharm Laboratories, 2004).

No mortality was observed during the test. The test was conducted using dimethylforamide to pre-dissolve the test material before dilution in test media. When analysed test concentrations were far lower than what was theoretically created, indicating that there were difficulties stemming from water solubility of the test material. The test material is known to possess low water solubility (0.243 mg/l at 20 ± 5 ºC). In the absence of any evidence of toxicity, and taking into consideration the difficulties in water solubility, it is considered that no evidence of toxicity is seen at the limit of solubility.

Chronic toxicity to fish:

In on OECD210 study, no mortalities or sub-lethal effects were observed following exposure of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larvae to the test material for 33 days (28 days post-hatch).  Based on the geometric mean measured concentration, the E(L)C10 and E(L)C50 values were determined to be greater than 0.20 mg/L for hatching, post-hatch survival, body length and wet weight. The No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC) based on survival or growth was 0.20 mg/L.

Acute toxicity to daphnia:

In an OECD 204 study, conducted to GLP, the 48-HourEC50 of methylenbis(dibutyldithiocarbamate) (centrifuged test media) todaphnia magna is greater than 0.052 mg/L (mean measured) and correspondingly the NOEC was 0.052 mg/L (Safepharm Laboratories, 2004).

No mortality was observed during the test. The test was conducted using dimethylforamide to pre-dissolve the test material before dilution in test media. When analysed test concentrations were far lower than what was theoretically created, indicating that there were difficulties stemming from water solubility of the test material. methylenbis(dibutyldithiocarbamate) is known to possess a low water solubility (0.243 mg/l at 20 ± 5 ºC). In the absence of any evidence of toxicity, and taking into consideration the difficulties in water solubility, it is considered that no evidence of toxicity is seen at the limit of solubility.

Chronic toxicity to daphnia:

In an OECD 211 study, conducted to GLP, the 21-day toxicity toDaphnia Magna NOEC and MATC of 4,4'-methylene bis(dibutyldithiocarbamate) was determined to be greater than 247 μg/L.

As the NOEC was 0.247 mg/l at 21 days, it is considered that there is no toxicity at the limit of water solubility (water solubility; 0.247 mg/l at 20 ± 5 ºC) (Harlan Laboratories, 2009).

Acute toxicity to algae:

In an OECD 201 study, conducted to GLP, the 72-Hour EC50 of methylenbis(dibutyldithiocarbamate) (centrifuged test media) toScenedesmus subspicatus is greater than 0.0325 mg/L (mean measured) and correspondingly the NOEC was 0.0325 mg/L (Safepharm Laboratories, 2004).

No mortality was observed during the test. The test was conducted using dimethylforamide to pre-dissolve the test material before delusion in test media. When analysed test concentrations were far lower than what was theoretically created, indicating that there were difficulties stemming from water solubility of the test material. The test material is known to possess a low water solubility (0.243 mg/l at 20 ± 5 ºC). In the absence of any evidence of toxicity, and taking into consideration the difficulties in water solubility, it is considered that no evidence of toxicity is seen at the limit of solubility.

Activated Sludge Respiration Inhibition:

In an OECD 209 study, conducted to GLP, methylenbis(dibutyldithiocarbamate) was not toxic to waste water (activated sludge) bacteria at or below a loading rate of 1000 mg/L (NOEC). The EC50 exceeded a loading rate of 1000 mg/L (WIL Research Europe, 2013).