Registration Dossier

Environmental fate & pathways

Endpoint summary

Administrative data

Description of key information

No data on the behavior of tungsten carbide in the environment are available. However, data for sodium tungstate and tungsten metal are expected to adequately capture the range of mobility of tungsten carbide in the environment.

The adsorption/desorption is highly dependent on the characteristics of the soil system in question. For example, soil sorption coefficients of tungsten metal and sodium tungstate are found to increase with decreasing pH (Bednar et al., 2008). Additionally, soil-tungsten systems may take up to approximately 3-4 months to reach equilibrium (Griggs et al., 2009 and Bednar et al., 2008).

Soil sorption coefficients measured for sodium tungstate ranged from 16.6 to 863 (Bednar et al., 2008 and Griggs et al., 2009).

Other partitioning coefficients for tungsten in the environment were estimated using paired sampling data. Tungsten partition coefficients for water-sediment were derived using paired environmental monitoring samples of tungsten in water and sediment collected in various parts of the EU, resulting in a median calculated Kd of 140000 (Salminen R (Ed.) et al., 2005).

The following partitioning coefficients were statistically derived based on studies using appropriate methodology:

Kd soils (Griggs et al., 2009 and Bednar et al., 2008):

10thpercentile: 44 L/kg

Median: 174 L/kg

90thpercentile: 692 L/kg

Kd sediment (Salminen R (Ed.) et al., 2005):

10thpercentile: 28395 L/kg

Median: 140000 L/kg

90thpercentile: 700000 L/kg

Volatilization is not expected to be a significant pathway for tungsten carbide, based on the low vapor pressure and ionic or insoluble state of most tungsten compounds in the environment.

Additional information