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Administrative data

Description of key information

Oral
rat LD50 ca. 8700 mg/kg (standardized test protocol) (Smyth et al. 1969)
mouse LD50 8300 mg/kg (Jenner et al. 1964)
Dermal
Rabbit LD50 > 17800 mg/kg (standardized test protocol) (Smyth et al. 1969)
Inhalation
Rat 4h LC50 vapour ca. 32 mg/L (standardized test protocol) (Smyth et al. 1969)
Rat inhalation hazard test: mortality after 1 h; no mortality after 30 min (calc. vapour saturation = ca. 140 mg/L) (standardized test protocol) (Smyth et al. 1969)

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Acute toxicity: via oral route

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
no adverse effect observed
Dose descriptor:
LD50
Value:
8 700 mg/kg bw

Acute toxicity: via inhalation route

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
no adverse effect observed
Dose descriptor:
LC50
Value:
32 000 mg/m³

Acute toxicity: via dermal route

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
no adverse effect observed
Dose descriptor:
LD50
Value:
17 800 mg/kg bw

Additional information

Oral

Data were available from older studies which meet generally accepted scientific principles and therefore allow the evaluation of the endpoint. All results indicate a low oral toxicity of propyl acetate.

Groups of five male Carworth-Wistar rats were treated with the test substance in doses of 3.55, 7.10 or 14.21 g/kg bw under standardized conditions and were observed for 14 d. The reported acute oral LD50 is 8700 mg/kg bw. Rats were sluggish and displayed labored breathing prior to death. (Smyth et al. 1969). In a study with an unknown test protocol, the acute oral LD50 for mice is 8300 mg/kg. Depression soon after treatment was observed (Jenner et al. 1964). In a study with unsuitable short observation period of 24 h, the acute oral LD50 for rabbits is 6638 mg/kg (Munch 1972; reliability score 3).

Dermal

Data are available from two older studies which meet generally accepted scientific principles and therefore allow the evaluation of the endpoint. The results indicate a low dermal toxicity of propyl acetate.

Four rabbits per treatment (doses unknown) were treated with the unchanged test substance for 24 h under occlusive conditions and were observed for 14 d thereafter. The acute dermal LD50 is > 17.8 g/kg for rabbits following the standardized test protocol (Smyth et al.1969). Groups of two guinea pigs were treated with the unchanged test substance in doses of 0.89 to 8.9 g/kg to for 24 h under occlusive conditions and were observed for 14 d thereafter. The acute dermal LD50 is > 8.9 g/kg for guinea pigs (Eastman Kodak 1959).

Inhalation

Data were available from older studies which meet generally accepted scientific principles and therefore allow the evaluation of the endpoint.

Groups of six female Wistar rats were to a vapour atmosphere for 4 h under standardized conditions to 16.7, 33.4 and 66.7 mg/L of the unchanged test substance. After a 14 -d observation period, the acute inhalative LC50 is ca. 32 mg/L (calculated ex post; Smyth et al. 1969). The inhalation of a saturated vapor-air mixture caused mortality in rats after exposure periods > 30 min (Smyth et al. 1969); the calculated vapour saturation treshold is ca. 140 mg/L.

Justification for classification or non-classification

Oral

Due to the low oral toxicity of propyl acetate (rat LD50 ca. 8700 mg/kg), the substance has not to be classified according to EU and GHS requirements.

Dermal

Due to the low dermal toxicity of propyl acetate (rabbit LD50 ca. 17800 mg/kg), the substance has not to be classified according to EU and GHS requirements.

Inhalation

Due to the low inhalative toxicity of propyl acetate (rat 4h LC50 vapour 32 mg/L), the substance has not to be classified according to EU and GHS requirements. Exposition over 30 min to a vapour saturated atmosphere can cause mortality.