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Environmental fate & pathways

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
other distribution data
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
other information
Reliability:
4 (not assignable)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: other test material (silica particles with iron (II,III) oxide core)

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Fate of Silica Nanoparticles in Simulated Primary Wastewater Treatment
Author:
Jarvie H et al.
Year:
2009
Bibliographic source:
Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 43, No. 22, pp. 8622-8628

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline available
GLP compliance:
not specified
Type of study:
other: sewage treatment model
Media:
water - sewage sludge

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Specific details on test material used for the study:
silicon dioxide nanoparticles of ca. 56 nm diameter and narrow polydispersity, consisting of an iron (II,III) oxide core (Fe3O4) encapsulated in a silica (SiO2) shell, synthesized and characterized
in-house

Results and discussion

Any other information on results incl. tables

Unfunctionalized silica particles (with Fe2O3 core) were stable and did not settle in wastewater during typical time scales of transit through the sewerage network and during the primary wastewater treatment process. In contrast, Tween-coated silica nanoparticles readily undergo flocculation on the same time scales and are likely to be retained by primary sedimentation and pass along a different environmental pathway, via sewage sludge.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Modifying the surface functionality of silica nanoparticles may change their colloidal behavior and fate in wastewater. In sewage treatment plants, silica nanoparticles may not be removed by sedimentation and continue through the effluent stream or may undergo flocculation and be retained in sewage sludge.
Executive summary:

Unfunctionalized silica particles (with Fe2O3 core) were stable and did not settle in wastewater during typical time scales of transit through the sewerage network and during the primary wastewater treatment process. In contrast, Tween-coated silica nanoparticles readily undergo flocculation on the same time scales and are likely to be retained by primary sedimentation and pass along a different environmental pathway, via sewage sludge.