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Environmental fate & pathways

Additional information on environmental fate and behaviour

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
additional information on environmental fate and behaviour
Type of information:
calculation (if not (Q)SAR)
Remarks:
Migrated phrase: estimated by calculation
Adequacy of study:
supporting study

Data source

Referenceopen allclose all

Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Global ozone research and monitoring project, scientific assessment of stratospheric ozone.
Author:
WMO
Year:
1989
Bibliographic source:
Report 20, Volume II, Appendix: AFEAS Report. World Meteorological Association, Geneva, Switzerland.
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Acid deposition in the United Kingdom 1986-1988.
Author:
UKRGAR
Year:
1990
Bibliographic source:
Third report of the United Kingdom Review Group on Acid Rain. United Kingdom Review Group on Acid Rain, Warren Spring Laboratory, Stevenage, UK.
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Acid deposition: perspective in time and space.
Author:
Galloway JW
Year:
1995
Bibliographic source:
Water Air and Soil Pollution 85:15‑24.

Materials and methods

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent

Results and discussion

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Executive summary:

Contribution to acid rain and environmental burden of fluoride ion On the basis of 15% conversion of HFC-134a to TFA and HF, 85% conversion to HCOOH, CO2 and HF, and uniform scavenging of the acids thus produced into the global average rainfall of 5 x 1011 kt/y, the calculated resulting levels of fluoride and acidity are low compared with those arising from existing sources: Assuming steady state conditions with an atmospheric release and degradation rate of 100 kt HFC-134a/y (equal to the expected releases in the early part of this century):

F– production would be 66 kt/y, i.e. very small compared with the estimated atmospheric fluoride flux of 1,000-8,000 kt/y (WMO, 1989).

The contribution of HFC-134a to the F– concentration in rainwater would be 0.12 ppbw . This level should be compared with typical fluoride concentrations in "background" rainwater of around 10 ppbw, i.e. 100 times greater, and with levels of about 1 ppmw   (1 mg/l) used for the fluoridation of drinking water, i.e. 10,000 times greater (WMO, 1989).

The trifluoroacetic, formic and hydrofluoric acids formed from HFC-134a and scavenged in rainwater would represent an acidity of close to 4.46 x 109 mol H+/y, i.e. about 3,000 times less than the acidity arising from natural and anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx (UKRGAR, 1990; Galloway, 1995). Thus the contribution of HFC-134a to acid rain would be negligible.