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Physical & Chemical properties

Melting point / freezing point

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Reference
Endpoint:
melting point/freezing point
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
18th October 2005
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Study conducted in compliance with agreed protocols, with no or minor deviation from standard test guidelines and/or minor methodological deficiencies, which do not affect the quality of relevant results.
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 102 (Melting point / Melting Range)
Deviations:
no
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
EU Method A.1 (Melting / Freezing Temperature)
Deviations:
no
GLP compliance:
yes (incl. certificate)
Type of method:
other: differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)
Melting / freezing pt.:
128 °C
Decomposition:
no
Remarks on result:
other: Probably a small amount of the test substance starts melting at 83°C.

Preliminary Test:

From approximately 350°C upwards the weight of the sample significantly decreased. At 408°C, the sample weight was decreased by 25%. After the experiment, there appeared to be no test substance remaining in the sample pan.

Main Study:

From preliminary experiments it was concluded that the test substance probably evaporates combined with reaction or decomposition above approximately 400°C (673K). A typical DSC-curve is shown in Figure 1 (see attached background material). After the experiments, there appeared to be no test substance remaining.

Figure 2 (see attached background material) shows the DSC-curve of the first heating that was recorded during the first experiment (25°C - 200°C). A small endothermic peak and large endothermic peak were observed between 70°C and 145°C. To determine if melting caused both peaks, the sample was cooled to 25°C and heated for a second time to 200°C. The DSC-curve of the second heating showed a similar pattern as the first heating. Therefore it can be concluded that melting of the test substance probably caused both endothermic peaks. The first peak with an extrapolated onset temperature of 83.05°C was probably caused by melting of a small fraction of the test substance. Melting of the major part of the test substance occurred at 127.87°C. After the experiment, the sample appeared to have been molten and had the same colour as at the beginning of the experiment.

Figure 3 (see attached background material) shows the DSC-curve of the first heating that was recorded during the second experiment (25°C - 160°C). Similar results as during the first experiment were obtained. The extrapolated onset temperature of the two endothermic peaks were 82.99°C and 127.97°C.

Conclusions:
The melting temperature of the test substance was determined to be 128°C (401K). Probably a small fraction of the test substance already melts at 83°C (356K).
Executive summary:

The determination of the melting point of EA-3098 was performed in accordance with the following guidelines:

OECD Guidelines no. 102 "Melting point/melting range" 1995 and EEC-Directive 92/69/EEC, Method A.1.

The melting temperature of EA-3098 was determined to be 128°C (401K). Probably a small fraction of the test substance starts melting at 83°C (356 K).

Description of key information

The melting temperature of the test substance was determined to be 128°C (401K). Probably a small fraction of the test substance already melts at 83°C (356K).

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Melting / freezing point at 101 325 Pa:
128 °C

Additional information

The determination of the melting point of EA-3098 was performed in accordance with the following guidelines:

OECD Guidelines no. 102 "Melting point/melting range" 1995 and EEC-Directive 92/69/EEC, Method A.1.

The melting temperature of EA-3098 was determined to be 128°C (401K). Probably a small fraction of the test substance starts melting at 83°C (356 K)