Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Endpoint:
toxicity to terrestrial arthropods: short-term
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Study period:
Not available
Reliability:
4 (not assignable)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: see 'Remark'
Remarks:
Study no performed in a GLP-certified laboratory; No standard or recognized guidelines followed; Solutions of organotins were not analyzed to verify concentrations; No information on statistical power, ranges of concentrations used, or control organisms were included in the report.
Cross-reference
Reason / purpose for cross-reference:
reference to same study

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Relations between structure and insecticidal activity of some organotin compounds.
Author:
Blum, M.S. and J.J. Pratt, Jr.
Year:
1960
Bibliographic source:
Journal of Economic Entomology. 53:445-448.

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline followed
Principles of method if other than guideline:
Method: other: unknown
GLP compliance:
no
Remarks:
Pre-dates GLP
Application method:
contact

Test material

Constituent 1
Reference substance name:
Tetra-n-octyltin
IUPAC Name:
Tetra-n-octyltin
Details on test material:
- Name of test material (as cited in study report): Tetra-n-octyltin
- Molecular formula (if other than submission substance): (n-C8H17)4Sn
- Substance type: Mono-constituent substance
Specific details on test material used for the study:
Details on properties of test surrogate or analogue material (migrated information):
No information.

Sampling and analysis

Analytical monitoring:
not specified
Details on sampling:
No data

Test substrate

Vehicle:
yes
Details on preparation and application of test substrate:
- Method of test material application: Single topical dose
- Volume of test solution applied: 1 µL
- Controls: Vehicle control
- Chemical name of vehicle (organic solvent, emulsifier or dispersant): Acetone
- Concentration of vehicle in test medium (stock solution and final test solution): Not given
- Evaporation of vehicle before use: No

Test organisms

Test organisms (species):
Musca domestica
Animal group:
Diptera (house fly)
Details on test organisms:
TEST ORGANISM
- Common name: House fly
- Source: CHemical Specialties Manufacturers Association (susceptible strain)
- Age at test initiation (mean and range, SD): 3 to 4 days old
- Weight at test initiation (mean and range, SD): Not given
- Date of collection: Not given
- Cultural background (if honeybees): N/A
- Disease free: N/A
- Kept according to standard practices: N/A


ACCLIMATION
- Acclimation period: 3 to 4 days following emergence from pupation
- Acclimation conditions (same as test or not): Same as test
- Feeding: Purina dog pellets, moistened for larvae; adults were fed a water suspension of powdered skimmed milk.
- Health during acclimation (any mortality observed): Not given

Study design

Study type:
laboratory study
Limit test:
no
Total exposure duration:
24 h
Post exposure observation period:
No additional information.

Test conditions

Test temperature:
32 +/- 1°C
pH (if soil or dung study):
N/A
Humidity:
50% +/- 5%
Photoperiod and lighting:
Not given
Details on test conditions:
TEST SYSTEM
- Test container (material, size): Exposed flies contained in Mason jars
- Amount of soil or substrate: N/A
- No. of organisms per treatment: 40
- No. of replicates per treatment group: Four
- No. of replicates per control: N/A
- No. of replicates per vehicle control: Unclear



OTHER TEST CONDITIONS
- Photoperiod: Not given
- Light intensity: Not given


EFFECT PARAMETERS MEASURED (with observation intervals if applicable) :
Mortality

VEHICLE CONTROL PERFORMED: Yes


TEST CONCENTRATIONS
- Spacing factor for test concentrations: Unclear, tetraoctyltin test concentrations not given
- Justification for using less concentrations than requested by guideline: N/A
- Range finding study
- Test concentrations: Not given
- Results used to determine the conditions for the definitive study: Not given
Nominal and measured concentrations:
Only LC50 value reported
Reference substance (positive control):
no
Remarks:
42 other tin-containing compounds tested for toxicity

Results and discussion

Effect concentrations
Dose descriptor:
LC50
Effect conc.:
196 other: x 10E-10 moles/fly
Nominal / measured:
nominal
Conc. based on:
test mat.
Basis for effect:
mortality
Details on results:
Only house fly mortality was quantified
Results with reference substance (positive control):
Although no formal reference substance was utilized, the toxicity of nine tetraalkyl and tetraaryl stannanes were evaluated with the house fly model. Of these, tetra-n-octyltin was the most toxic compounds.
Reported statistics and error estimates:
Not reported

Any other information on results incl. tables

No relevant tables or figures included.

The tetra-substituted organotins do not exhibit much insecticidal activity and approximate the toxicities of the disubstituted organotins. The most toxic member of this series was tetra-n-octyltin. Toxicity increased regularly with chain length up to eight carbon atoms.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Validity criteria fulfilled:
not specified
Conclusions:
The LC50 (24h) for tetraocytltin is 196 x 10E-10 moles/fly.
Executive summary:

The LC50 (24h) for tetraocytltin is 196 x 10E-10 moles/fly.

Tetraalkyl and Tetraryl Tin Derivatives:

The tetra-substituted oragnotins do not exhibit mush insecticidal activity and approximate the toxicities of the distributed organotins. The most toxic member of this series was tetra-n-octyltin. Toxicity increased regularly with chain length up to eight carbon atoms, except in the case of tetraisopropyltin. Replacement of two methyl groups with vinyl species does not affect toxicity, while replacement of the ethyl species of tetraethyltin with vinyl groups destroys toxicity. Whereas phenyl compares favorably with various alkyls as a tin substitute in the di- and trisubstitued organotins, the derivative produced by the arylation of tin is far less toxic, than the alkyls in the tetra-substituted species. Since cuticular penetration occurs most rapidly in the case of fat soluble materials and tetraphenyltin is relatively insoluble in most fat solvents, its lack of toxicity may possibly be attributable to poor penetration.