Registration Dossier

Diss Factsheets

Environmental fate & pathways

Endpoint summary

Administrative data

Description of key information

Phototransformation in air

There is data available for this substance. Additionally, key data is available for the structural analogue Pentane and is presented in the dossier. The data is read across to this substance based on analogue read across and a discussion and report on the read across strategy is provided as an attachment inIUCLID Section 13.

Hydrolysis

 

Hydrolysis is a reaction in which a hydroxide ion of a water molecule substitutes for another atom or group of atoms present in a chemical resulting in a structural change of that chemical. Potentially hydrolysable groups include alkyl halides, amides, carbamates, carboxylic acid esters and lactone epoxides, phosphate esters, and sulfonic acid esters. The lack of a suitable leaving group renders compounds resistant to hydrolysis.

The chemical constituents that comprise the substance consist entirely of carbon and hydrogen and do not contain hydrolysable groups. As such, they have a very low potential to hydrolyze. Therefore, this degradative process will not contribute to their removal from the environment.

In accordance with section 1 of REACH Annex XI, the hydrolysis study does not need to be conducted as this substance is not expected to undergo hydrolysis in the environment due to a lack of hydrolyzable functional groups and therefore not conducting the test is scientifically justifiable.

 

Phototransformation in water

 

The available evidence demonstrates that this substance does not absorb light within a range of 290 to 750 nm, the range in which photolysis occurs. Therefore, direct photolysis will not contribute to the degradation of this substance in the aquatic environment. Further testing is not required under Annex XI, section 1.2.

 

Phototransformation in soil

 

The available evidence demonstrates that this substance does not absorb light within a range of 290 to 750 nm, the range in which photolysis occurs. Therefore, direct photolysis will not contribute to the degradation of this substance in the terrestrial environment. Further testing is not required under Annex XI, section 1.2.

Additional information