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Administrative data

Endpoint:
vapour pressure
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
June - November 2011
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Study conducted according to the respective OECD guideline and under GLP.

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
study report
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
2011
Report date:
2011

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 104 (Vapour Pressure Curve)
GLP compliance:
yes
Type of method:
effusion method: by loss of weight or by trapping vaporisate
Remarks:
isothermal thermogravimetric effusion method

Test material

Constituent 1
Chemical structure
Reference substance name:
Nadide
EC Number:
200-184-4
EC Name:
Nadide
Cas Number:
53-84-9
Molecular formula:
C21H27N7O14P2
IUPAC Name:
nadide
Details on test material:
- Substance type: organic
- Physical state: off-white powder
- Storage condition of test material: in refrigerator (2-8°C)

Results and discussion

Vapour pressureopen allclose all
Temp.:
ca. 20 °C
Vapour pressure:
< 0.002 Pa
Temp.:
ca. 25 °C
Vapour pressure:
< 0.004 Pa

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
The isothermal TGA effusion method was applied for the determination of the vapour pressure of nadide. The vapour pressure of the test substance at 20°C and 25°C was: < 1.5 x 10-3 Pa and < 4.2 x 10-3 Pa respectively.
Executive summary:

The vapour pressure of the test substance (PT) was determined by the isothermal thermogravimetric effusion method (OECD 104). The method is validated in the range 10-8 - 103 Pa using a set of five reference substances with known vapour pressures. Approximately 3.76 and 5.94 mg of the test substance was applied to the surface of a roughened glass plate as a homogeneous layer using a suspension of the test substance in hexane. The plate was dried under nitrogen in the thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The weight loss of the test substance was measured continuously as a function of time. The vapour pressure is a function of the temperature and is specified in Pascal (Pa) or in mm Hg. The weight loss of the test substance at 110°C, 120°C, 130°C and 140°C was lower than the weight loss of hexachlorobenzene at the same temperatures. The vapour pressure of the test substance at 20°C and 25°C was: < 1.5 x 10-3 Pa and < 4.2 x 10-3 Pa respectively.