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Boiling point

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Reference
Endpoint:
boiling point
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
03 April 2017 to 05 April 2017
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 103 (Boiling Point)
Version / remarks:
1995
Deviations:
no
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
EU Method A.2 (Boiling Temperature)
Version / remarks:
2008
Deviations:
no
GLP compliance:
yes (incl. QA statement)
Type of method:
method according to Siwoloboff
Key result
Atm. press.:
97.8 kPa
Decomposition:
yes
Remarks:
Boiling point for the decomposing product is 270 to 350 °C.
Remarks on result:
other: Boiling point for the decomposing product was determined.

The observations were as follows in each test:

At about 225 °C the whole test item was liquid. At about 230 °C the liquid began to turn brown. At about 240 °C the top of the sample was brown, the bottom of sample was light brown that became opalescent at about 250 °C. At about 270 °C the liquid became clear, the whole sample was brown and few little bubbles appeared, then bigger bubbles began to appear. At about 300 °C the sample was strongly dark, the smaller bubbles appeared fast, then at about 304 °C bigger bubbles began to form faster. At about 345 °C the bigger bubbles formed continuously and quickly, but it did not appear as a typical boiling normally appears.

The Main tests were carried out at 97.8 kPa atmospheric pressure.

The observations demonstrate that the test item changes colour on heating, indicating decomposition occurs before boiling at normal atmospheric pressure. Hence the definite Boiling Point for the Test Item is not definable at normal atmospheric pressure, but it can be said that the decomposing product boils at 270 - 350 °C, with further boiling of a very dark decomposition product at higher temperatures.

The test item decomposes but does not boil at normal atmospheric pressure.

Conclusions:
Under the conditions of this study the definite Boiling Point for the test material is not definable at normal atmospheric pressure. The decomposing product boils at 270 to 350 °C, with further boiling of a very dark decomposition product at higher temperatures.
Executive summary:

The boiling point of the test material was investigated in accordance with the standardised guidelines OECD 103 and EU Method A.2 under GLP conditions.

The boiling point of the test material was determined by the capillary method using a metal heating block. The test material was assessed visually for any possible changes in its appearance, consistency and colour.

The observations demonstrate that the test material changes colour on heating, indicating decomposition occurs before boiling at normal atmospheric pressure (97.8 kPa in this study). Hence the definite Boiling Point for the test material is not definable at normal atmospheric pressure.

Under the conditions of this study it can be said that the decomposing product boils at 270 to 350 °C, with further boiling of a very dark decomposition product at higher temperatures. The definite Boiling Point for the test material is not definable at normal atmospheric pressure.

Description of key information

Under the conditions of this study the definite Boiling Point for the test material is not definable at normal atmospheric pressure. The decomposing product boils at 270 to 350 °C, with further boiling of a very dark decomposition product at higher temperatures.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information

The boiling point of the test material was investigated in accordance with the standardised guidelines OECD 103 and EU Method A.2 under GLP conditions. The study was awarded a reliability score of 1 in accordance with the criteria set forth by Klimisch et al. (1997).

The boiling point of the test material was determined by the capillary method using a metal heating block. The test material was assessed visually for any possible changes in its appearance, consistency and colour.

The observations demonstrate that the test material changes colour on heating, indicating decomposition occurs before boiling at normal atmospheric pressure (97.8 kPa in this study). Hence the definite Boiling Point for the test material is not definable at normal atmospheric pressure.

Under the conditions of this study it can be said that the decomposing product boils at 270 to 350 °C, with further boiling of a very dark decomposition product at higher temperatures. The definite Boiling Point for the test material is not definable at normal atmospheric pressure.