Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Hazard for aquatic organisms

Freshwater

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Marine water

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

STP

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Sediment (freshwater)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Sediment (marine water)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for air

Air

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Soil

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for predators

Secondary poisoning

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no potential for bioaccumulation

Additional information

The pigment chromium iron oxide is environmentally and biologically inert due to the characteristics of the synthetic process (calcination at high temperatures, approximately 1000°C), rendering the substance to be of a unique, stable crystalline structure in which all atoms are tightly bound and not prone to dissolution in environmental and physiological media. The very low solubility of the pigment or complete lack thereof under environmental conditions was demonstrated in a transformation/dissolution test for 7 and 28 days according to OECD Series 29 (Pardo Martinez, 2010a). Bioaccessibility data in physiological fluids (Pardo Martinez, 2010b) further indicate a biological inertness. Based on the resulting physico-chemical properties, especially the high insolubility of the pigment under environmental and biological conditions, the substance can be expected to not have a potential to cross or adsorb to biological membranes. Therefore, reversible or irreversible adverse toxicological effects on aquatic or terrestrial organisms are not expected, and a PNEC derivation is scientifically not justifiable.

Conclusion on classification

Chromium iron oxide is considered to be environmentally inert. Transformation/dissolution of chromium iron oxide (according to OECD Series 29: (i) 24 h, loading of 100 mg/L, pH 6 and 8; (ii) 7 d, loading of 100 mg/L, pH 6; and (iii) 28 d, loading of 1 mg/L, pH 6) resulted in metal concentrations that are below the respective LODs for iron and chromium (< 0.5 µg/L) (Pardo Martinez, 2010).

Thus, chromium and iron concentrations at 1 mg/l loading rate in a 7-days full T/D test are below acute ecotoxicity reference values of the dissolved form of the contained metals, and classification criteria of Acute (Short-term) Aquatic Hazard are not met.

Further, chromium and iron concentrations at 1 mg/l loading rate in a 28-days full T/D test are below chronic ecotoxicity reference values of the dissolved form of the contained metals, and classification criteria of Chronic (Long-term) Aquatic Hazard are not met.

Based on the high insolubility of the pigment under environmental conditions, reversible or irreversible adverse toxicological effects on aquatic or terrestrial organisms are not expected. Hence, classification as Aquatic Hazard is not required.