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Toxicological information

Health surveillance data

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
health surveillance data
Adequacy of study:
other information
Study period:
before 1960
Reliability:
4 (not assignable)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
documentation insufficient for assessment
Remarks:
smoking status of worker not provided. Occupational history of worker not known

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
secondary source
Title:
No information
Author:
Kollo RM
Year:
1960
Bibliographic source:
Trudy Leningradskogo Sanitarno-Gigienicheskogo Meditinskogo Instituta 62, 128-131 [Russian]. As cited in IARC 2010

Materials and methods

Study type:
health record from industry
Endpoint addressed:
other: exposure conditions in a Russian channel black plant

Test material

Constituent 1
Chemical structure
Reference substance name:
Carbon black
EC Number:
215-609-9
EC Name:
Carbon black
Cas Number:
1333-86-4
Molecular formula:
C
IUPAC Name:
Carbon black

Method

Type of population:
occupational

Results and discussion

Results:
160 measurements in a Russian channel black plant were reported. Airborne dust levels ranged from 44 to 407 mg/m3 in the factory area, from 25.3 to 278.6 mg/m3 in the working aisles, from 9.3 to 972 mg/m3 in the pelleting area and from 26.7 to 208.6 mg/m3 in the packing area. Coughing, dyspnoea, and chest pains were reported twice as frequent as among non-carbon black workers from a channel black plant. Clinical investigations of workers revealed the following: chest X-ray evidence of the effects of dust with an increasing frequency of fine-loop fibrosis, thickening of the interlobular pleura, and darkening of the lung X-ray with increasing work time

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
No conclusions can be drawn from the reported summary of work done before 1960.
Executive summary:

Coughing, dyspnoea, and chest pains were reported twice as frequent as among non-carbon black workers from a channel black plant.  Dust concentrations were exceptionally high, with a range from 9.3 mg/m3 (minimum, found in the pelletizing area) to 972.0 mg/m3 (maximum, found in the pelletizing area). Clinical investigations of workers revealed the following: chest X-ray evidence of the effects of dust, with an increasing frequency of fine-loop fibrosis, thickening of the interlobular pleura, and darkening of the lung X-ray with increasing work time.