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Toxicological information

Exposure related observations in humans: other data

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
exposure-related observations in humans: other data
Type of information:
other: Human case
Adequacy of study:
disregarded due to major methodological deficiencies
Reliability:
other: Any kind of reliability rating is not considered to be applicable, since human studies/reports are not conducted/reported according to standardised guidelines.
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: study report with lack of information; they do not give any actual levels of any of the measured metals. It cannot be assumed that the levels of molybdenum were not associated with adverse outcomes.

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Issues of human exposure to agents causing developmental toxicity
Author:
Tabacova, S.; Vukov, M.
Year:
1992
Bibliographic source:
Cong. Anom. (Senten Ijo) 32(Suppl.):21-30

Materials and methods

Endpoint addressed:
developmental toxicity / teratogenicity

Test material

Constituent 1
Chemical structure
Reference substance name:
Molybdenum
EC Number:
231-107-2
EC Name:
Molybdenum
Cas Number:
7439-98-7
Molecular formula:
Mo
IUPAC Name:
molybdenum
Details on test material:
- Metals analysed in potable water: Pb, Zn, Cu, As, Cd, Mo, Vs, Ni, Ti, Cr, Co, Li, Sr, Fe, Mn, Ba, Sn, Al, Ca, Mg, K, Na, F
- Metals analysed in soil: Pb, Mn, Zn, Co, Mo, Ni, Sn

Method

Details on study design:
The paper states that molybdenum was measured in drinking water and soil in various areas (presumably of Bulgaria, but this is not stated).

Results and discussion

Results:
There is no mention of molybdenum in any of the results. It is reported that excess of heavy metals, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Mn, and deficit of Zn, Cu, and Ni, and especially when these two coincided, are associated with poor reproductive outcomes, but there is no mention of molybdenum.
Since there are no actual levels of any of the metals given, it cannot be assumed that the levels of molybdenum were not associated with adverse outcomes, since it is not known what variability in molybdenum levels existed. If all the Mo levels were similar this could account for lack of correlation.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
The paper states that molybdenum was measured in drinking water and soil in various areas (presumably of Bulgaria, but this is not stated). It is reported that excess of heavy metals, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Mn, and deficit of Zn, Cu, and Ni, and especially when these two coincided, are associated with poor reproductive outcomes, but there is no mention of molybdenum.
Since they do not give any actual levels of any of the metals, it cannot be assumed that the levels of molybdenum were not associated with adverse outcomes, since it is not known what variability in molybdenum levels existed. If all the Mo levels were similar this could account for lack of correlation.