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Toxicological information

Basic toxicokinetics

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
basic toxicokinetics in vivo
Type of information:
migrated information: read-across based on grouping of substances (category approach)
Adequacy of study:
weight of evidence
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Conversion of iodate to iodide in vivo and in vitro.
Author:
Taurog A. Howells EM, Nachimson HI,
Year:
1966
Bibliographic source:
J Biol Chem, 241:4686–4693.

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
other:
Principles of method if other than guideline:
No data available
GLP compliance:
not specified

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
- Name of test material : potassium iodate
- Molecular formula : KIO3
- Molecular weight : 214 g/mol
- Substance type : Inorganic
- Physical state : Solid (powder)
Radiolabelling:
yes

Test animals

Species:
rabbit
Strain:
not specified
Sex:
not specified

Administration / exposure

Route of administration:
intraperitoneal
Vehicle:
not specified
Details on exposure:
Rabbits were given doses of 0.750 to 1.0 µg of iodine) intraperitoneally using iodate injection
Duration and frequency of treatment / exposure:
No data available
Doses / concentrations
Remarks:
Doses / Concentrations:
0.750 to 1.0 µg of iodine
No. of animals per sex per dose:
No data available
Control animals:
not specified

Results and discussion

Main ADME resultsopen allclose all
Type:
absorption
Results:
Rapid absorption of iodate by the thyroid gland has been reported
Type:
distribution
Results:
After iodate injection, radioactivity in tissues (as well as in urine) was exclusively in the form of iodide.
Type:
metabolism
Results:
iodate is quantitatively reduced to iodide by non-enzymatic reactions and thus becomes available to the body as iodide. Therefore, except perhaps for the gsatro-intestinal mucosa, exposure of tissues to iodate might be minimal.
Type:
excretion
Results:
There are reports suggesting a direct blood-to-intestine excretion route for iodide.

Toxicokinetic / pharmacokinetic studies

Details on absorption:
Rapid absorption of iodate by the thyroid gland has been reported
Details on distribution in tissues:
After iodate injection, radioactivity in tissues (as well as in urine) was exclusively in the form of iodide.
Details on excretion:
There are reports suggesting a direct blood-to-intestine excretion route for iodide

Metabolite characterisation studies

Metabolites identified:
no

Bioaccessibility

Bioaccessibility testing results:
In humans and rats, oral bioavailability of iodine from iodate is virtually equivalent to that from iodide

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Interpretation of results (migrated information): low bioaccumulation potential based on study results
From the information available above, the bio-accumulation potential of potassium iodate appears to be low (except in eye). At much higher doses given intravenously (i.e., above 10 mg/kg), iodate is highly toxic to the retina. Ocular toxicity in humans has occurred only after exposure to doses of 600 to 1200 mg per individual.
Executive summary:

From the information available above, the bio-accumulation potential of potassium iodate appears to be low (except in eye). At much higher doses given intravenously (i.e., above 10 mg/kg), iodate is highly toxic to the retina. Ocular toxicity in humans has occurred only after exposure to doses of 600 to 1200 mg per individual.