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Boiling point

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Reference
Endpoint:
boiling point
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
2004-08-23 to 2004-11-18
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study
Reason / purpose for cross-reference:
reference to same study
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
EU Method A.2 (Boiling Temperature)
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 103 (Boiling point/boiling range)
GLP compliance:
yes
Type of method:
differential scanning calorimetry
Decomposition:
yes
Decomp. temp.:
163 - 175 °C

Expt 1: Two small endothermic effects were observed: between 35°C and 67°C and between 67°C and 130°C. An exothermic effect started at about 175°C, probably caused by reaction or decomposition of the test substance. After the experiment, the sample had a light-yellow colour (original colour: white). The sample appearred to have not been molten, but the particles had coalesced. Weighing showed that the sample had lost 3% of its mass.

Expt 2: A small endothermic effect was observed between 35°C and 60°C. The DSC-curve recorded during the second run of the second experiment (25°C - 65°C) showed no heat effect. After the experiment, the consistency of the sample had not changed. The sample had lost 1% of its mass. It is very likely that the endothermic effect was caused by evaporation of a small part of the test substance, possibly volatile impurities.

Expt 3: Two small endothermic effects were observed: between 35°C and 61°C and between 61°C and 122°C. The DSC-curve that was recorded during the second run of the third experiment (25°C - 155°C) showed three small endothermic effects: between 48°C and 67°C, between 67°C and 82°C and between 93°C and 132°C. After the experiment the sample appeared not to have been molten, but the particles coalesced. The colour of the sample had not changed. The sample had lost 1% of its mass.

Expt 4: Two (small) endothermic effects were observed: between 38°C and 63°C and between 63°C and 125°C. An exothermic effect started at about 163°C, probably caused by reaction or decomposition of the test substance. After the experiment, the sample had a light-yellow colour. The sample appeared to have not been molten, but the particles had coalesced. The sample had lost 1% of its mass.

Conclusions:
Reaction or decomposition of the test material was observed above 163°C - 175°C. Complete melting or boiling of the test material was not observed below the temperature at which reaction or decomposition started. The observation of a small endothermic effect between about 65°C and 130°C and the coalescing of the powder particles indicate that possibly a small part of the test substance melted in the given temperature range. Below 65°C a small part of the test material evaporated (possibly volatile impurities).
No melting or boiling temperature could be determined for the test material. Reaction or decomposition started at 163°C - 175°C.
Executive summary:

In a melting/boiling point study performed in accordance with EC Method A1 and OECD Guideline No 102 using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) no melting or boiling temperature could be determined for the test material. Reaction or decomposition started at 163°C - 175°C.

Description of key information

The substance decomposes without melting/boiling starting at 163°C - 175°C.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information

In a melting/boiling point study performed in accordance with EC Method A1 and OECD Guideline No 102 using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) no melting or boiling temperature could be determined for the test material. Reaction or decomposition started at 163°C - 175°C.