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Hazard for aquatic organisms

Hazard for air

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Hazard for predators

Additional information

Conclusion on classification

Short-term toxicity results for Daphnia and algae are available for the substance. The 72h-ErC50 value for the substance based on the di-ester (1.2 mg/L) represents a Water Soluble Fraction prepared at a loading rate of 10 mg/L and the 72h-ErC10 value for the substance based on the di-ester (0.24 mg/L) represents a Water Soluble Fraction prepared at a loading rate between 1 and 3.2 mg/L. The available 48h-EC50 value for the substance based on the di-ester (3 mg/L) represents a Water Soluble Fraction prepared at a loading rate between 18 and 32 mg/L.

Acute

As the available 72h-ErC50 and 48h-EC50 values for the substance based on the di-ester represent Water Soluble Fractions prepared at a loading rate above 1 mg/L, the substance does not need to be classified for acute aquatic hazard in accordance with the CLP Regulation.

Chronic

According to CLP Figure 4.1.1, the chronic classification has to be determined based on the chronic value for algae according to Table 4.1.0, (b) ii (as the substance is readily biodegradable), as well as based on the acute value available for Daphnia according to Table 4.1.0, (b) iii, and the most stringent outcome should be leading:

 

- As the 72h-ErC10 value for the substance based on the di-ester (0.24 mg/L) represents a Water Soluble Fraction prepared at a loading rate above 1 mg/L, the substance does not need to be classified for chronic toxicity based on this value.

- Although the 48h-EC50 value for the substance based on the di-ester (3 mg/L) represents a Water Soluble Fraction prepared at a loading rate between 18 and 32 mg/L (and thus falling in the category 10 - 100 mg/L), it is not considered justified to classify the substance as Chronic Cat. 3 based on this value. The substance is readily biodegradable and there is no conclusive information available about the log Kow, nor about the BCF. As there is therefore no conclusive information available about the bioaccumulation potential of this surface active substance (well soluble in water and octanol), classification, based on the (current) available information, is not considered justified.

Overall it can therefore be concluded that, based on the current available information, the substance does not need to be classified for environmental hazards in accordance with the CLP Regulation. For chronic classification, the reason for no classification is 'data lacking', due to the lack of conclusive information about the bioaccumulation potential of the substance.