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Boiling point

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Reference
Endpoint:
boiling point
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 103 (Boiling point/boiling range)
Deviations:
no
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
EU Method A.2 (Boiling Temperature)
Deviations:
no
GLP compliance:
no
Type of method:
differential scanning calorimetry
Key result
Boiling pt.:
> 185 °C
Decomposition:
yes
Decomp. temp.:
> 185 °C

In the TGA test a sample of the test item was heated from 30 °C to 950 °C in an inert gas atmosphere (N2). Between 50 °C and 80 °C it lost 1.9 % of its weight (fig.1), which can be attributed to the evaporation of water.

Above 80 °C no significant weight loss was recorded up to 221 °C (onset temperature). Then the weight continuously decreased and reached a loss of approx. 100 % at 410 °C.

At 205 °C (onset) the DSC test traces showed an endothermic signal which could be allocated to a boiling behaviour, however, from the visual inspection (“above 185 °C the sample becomes jellylike and started to fume”) this endotherm has to be allocated to a degradation process.

This assumption can also be deduced from the literature, as it is well known that quaternary components tend to degrade above temperatures of 120 °C (Hoffmann degradation; reversed Menshutkin reaction).

Conclusions:
No boiling point could be detected. At a temperature > 185 °C decomposition starts.
Executive summary:

The boiling point of the substance was determined according to OECD guideline 103 using the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) method. Above 80 °C no significant weight loss was recorded up to 221 °C (onset temperature). Then the weight continuously decreased and reached a loss of approx. 100 % at 410 °C.

At 205 °C (onset) the DSC test traces an endothermic signal which could be allocated to a boiling behaviour, however, from the visual inspection (“above 185 °C the sample becomes jellylike and started to fume”) this endotherm has to be allocated to a degradation process.

This assumption can also be deduced from the literature, as it is well known that quaternary components tend to degrade above temperatures of 120 °C (Hoffmann degradation; reversed Menshutkin reaction).

No boiling point could be detected. The substance decomposes at a temperature > 185 °C.

Description of key information

decomposition >185°C, no boiling point; OECD Guideline 103; RL1; no GLP

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information

The boiling point of C16 Alkylamidopropyltrimethylammonium Chloride was determined according to OECD guideline 103 using the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) method. Above 80 °C no significant weight loss was recorded up to 221 °C (onset temperature). Then the weight continuously decreased and reached a loss of approx. 100 % at 410 °C.

At 205 °C (onset) the DSC test traces an endothermic signal which could be allocated to a boiling behaviour, however, from the visual inspection (“above 185 °C the sample becomes jellylike and started to fume”) this endotherm has to be allocated to a degradation process.

This assumption can also be deduced from the literature, as it is well known that quaternary components tend to degrade above temperatures of 120 °C (Hoffmann degradation; reversed Menshutkin reaction).

No boiling point could be detected. The substance decomposes at a temperature > 185 °C.