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Boiling point

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Reference
Endpoint:
boiling point
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 103 (Boiling Point)
Version / remarks:
1955
Deviations:
no
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
EU Method A.2 (Boiling Temperature)
Version / remarks:
2008
Deviations:
no
GLP compliance:
no
Type of method:
differential scanning calorimetry
Remarks:
+ thermogravimetry
Decomposition:
yes
Decomp. temp.:
>= 179 °C

In the TGA test, a sample of the test item was heated from 30 °C to 455 °C in an inert gas atmosphere (N2). Between 30 °C and 85 °C it lost 0.6 % of its weight, which can be mainly attributed to the partial evaporation of residual iso-propanol and water.

Above 179 °C (onset) the weight continuously decreased and reached a loss of approx. 99.5 % at 360 °C.

Even in the preliminary DSC test an endothermic signal was recorded above 179 °C (178.9 °C (onset) and 231.8 °C (endset)). Thus, with the recorded weight loss this effect could be allocated to a boiling behaviour, however, from the knowledge of the chemical structures this endotherm is most likely allocated to a degradation process.

This assumption can also be deduced from the literature, as it is well known that quaternary structures tend to degrade above temperatures of 120 °C (Hoffmann degradation; reversed Menshutkin reaction). In order to provide evidence for this assumption, a degradation test was performed during which 18.9974 mg of the sample were heated to 230°C for 5 minutes (upper range of the suspected boiling range) and the remaining residue war characterised by NMR spectroscopy. A weight loss of 28.9 % was recorded and according to the NMR analysis, the residue consisted almost exclusively of alkenes, the anticipated degradation product of the Hoffmann degradation. Consequently, the test item does not provide a boiling point but starts to disintegrate at about 179°C.

Conclusions:
No boiling point could be detected; decomposition above 179 °C.
Executive summary:

The boiling point of Di-C12-18 alkyldimethyl ammonium chloride was determined according to OECD Guideline 103 (1995) and EU method A.2 (2008) using thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. No boiling point was detected; the test item started to disintegrate above 179 °C.

Description of key information

no boiling point, decomposition >179°C (OECD TG 103/EU method A.2; RL1, non-GLP)

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information

The boiling point of Di-C12-18 alkyldimethyl ammonium chloride was determined according to OECD Guideline 103 (1995) and EU method A.2 (2008) using thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. No boiling point was detected; the test item started to disintegrate above 179 °C.