Registration Dossier

Diss Factsheets

Physical & Chemical properties

Vapour pressure

Currently viewing:

Administrative data

Link to relevant study record(s)

Reference
Endpoint:
vapour pressure
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
From June 12, 2017 to September 20, 2017
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
EU Method A.4 (Vapour Pressure)
Version / remarks:
2009
Deviations:
no
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 104 (Vapour Pressure Curve)
Version / remarks:
2006
Deviations:
no
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
EPA OPPTS 830.7950 (Vapor Pressure)
Version / remarks:
1996
Deviations:
no
GLP compliance:
yes
Type of method:
effusion method: isothermal thermogravimetry
Key result
Temp.:
20 °C
Vapour pressure:
< 0.002 Pa
Key result
Temp.:
25 °C
Vapour pressure:
< 0.005 Pa

The weight of the test substance did not decrease constantly with time during the isothermal steps throughout the investigated temperature range. This might have been caused by the presence of minor components with higher volatility or (partial) reaction and/or decomposition of the test substance during testing. A log p versus 1/T curve for the test substance yielded a curve with a coefficient of correlation (r) of < 0.99. Extrapolation of the curve to 20°C or 25°C would not give reliable results for the vapour pressure of the substance at these temperatures.

 

Since the weight losses of the test substance at 100°C, 110°C, 120°C and 130°C were lower than the weight losses of reference substance hexachlorobenzene at the same temperatures, it was concluded that vapour pressure of the substance at 20°C (25°C) is lower than the vapour pressure of hexachlorobenzene at 20°C (25°C).

Conclusions:
Under the study conditions, from the measured weight losses in the temperature range 100 -130°C, the vapour pressure of the test substance was determined to be lower than the vapour pressure of reference substance hexachlorobenzene. The vapour pressure of the test substance at 20°C and 25°C was therefore concluded to be < 1.5E-3 Pa and < 4.8E-3 Pa, respectively (Reingruber, 2017).
Executive summary:

A study was conducted to determine the vapour pressure of the test substance according to OECD Guideline 104, EU Method A.4 and OPPTS 830.7950. The vapour pressure of the test substance was determined using the isothermal thermogravimetric effusion method. Under the study conditions, from the measured weight losses in the temperature range 100 -130°C, the vapour pressure of the test substance was determined to be lower than the vapour pressure of reference substance hexachlorobenzene. The vapour pressure of the test substance at 20°C and 25°C was therefore concluded to be < 1.5E-3 Pa and < 4.8E-3 Pa, respectively (Reingruber, 2017).

Description of key information

The vapour pressure was determined according to OECD Guideline 104, EU Method A.4 and OPPTS 830.7950 (Reingruber, 2017).

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Vapour pressure:
0.002 Pa
at the temperature of:
20 °C

Additional information

< 1.5E-3 Pa. (20°C)

< 4.8E-3 Pa. (25°C)