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Link to relevant study record(s)

Reference
Endpoint:
oxidising solids
Type of information:
(Q)SAR
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
Not applicable
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: This expert statement follows an approach described in international guidelines.
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
EU Method A.17 (Oxidising Properties (Solids))
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
other: UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (Manual of Tests and Criteria, 5th edition, 2009; Appendix 6 ‘Screening Procedures’)
GLP compliance:
no
Remarks:
(not applicable)
Key result
Sample tested:
other: examination of the chemical structure
Parameter:
other: examination of the chemical structure
Remarks on result:
other: unlikely to be an oxidising substance.

Discussion and Conclusion:

Examination of the chemical structure of the substance confirms that it contains a halogen and an alkali metal. However, the lithium ion (Li+ ) is a constituent of a stable ionic structure that does not contain oxygen. The halogen atom is not part of a characteristic structure. It can be predicted that the substance does not possess oxidising properties, or contribute to the combustion of other materials. It is therefore concluded that Trilithium hexafluoroaluminate is unlikely to be an oxidising substance.

Interpretation of results:
other: no oxidising properties
Conclusions:
Lithium cryolite is unlikely to be an oxidising substance.
Executive summary:

An expert statement on the oxidising properties of Lithium cryolite has been elaborated based on the chemical structure of the material. This approach is described as acceptable in the European Council Regulation (EC) No 440/2018 of 30 May 2008 (Method A.17. ‘Oxidizing Properties solids’) and in the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (Manual of Tests and Criteria, 5th edition, 2009; Appendix 6 ‘Screening Procedures’).

Examination of the chemical structure of the substance confirms that it contains a halogen and an alkali metal. However, the lithium ion (Li+) is a constituent of a stable ionic structure that does not contain oxygen. The halogen atom is not part of a characteristic structure. It can be predicted that the substance does not possess oxidising properties, or contribute to the combustion of other materials.

It is therefore concluded that Lithium cryolite is unlikely to be an oxidising substance.

Description of key information

Lithium Cryolite is considered to not possess oxidising properties

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Oxidising properties:
no

Additional information

An expert statement on the oxidising properties of Lithium cryolite has been elaborated based on the chemical structure of the material. This approach is described as acceptable in the European Council Regulation (EC) No 440/2018 of 30 May 2008 (Method A.17. ‘Oxidizing Properties solids’) and in the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (Manual of Tests and Criteria, 5th edition, 2009; Appendix 6 ‘Screening Procedures’).

Examination of the chemical structure of the substance confirms that it contains a halogen and an alkali metal. However, the lithium ion (Li+) is a constituent of a stable ionic structure that does not contain oxygen. The halogen atom is not part of a characteristic structure. It can be predicted that the substance does not possess oxidising properties, or contribute to the combustion of other materials.

It is therefore concluded that Lithium cryolite is unlikely to be an oxidising substance.

Justification for classification or non-classification

 Based on the chemical structure of the substance, the classification is not warranted in accordance with Directive 67/548/EEC and EU Classification, Labelling and Packaging of Substances and Mixtures (CLP) Regulation (EC) No. 1272/2008