Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Link to relevant study record(s)

Reference
Endpoint:
explosiveness, other
Type of information:
(Q)SAR
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
not applicable
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: This expert statement follows an approach described in international guidelines.
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
EU Method A.14 (Explosive properties)
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
other: UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (Manual of Tests and Criteria, 5th edition, 2009; Appendix 6 ‘Screening Procedures’)
GLP compliance:
no
Remarks:
not applicable
Key result
Parameter:
other: Assessment based on the chemical strcuture.
Remarks on result:
negative (not further specified)

Discussion and Conclusion:

Examination of the chemical structure of the substance indicates it does not contain any of the characteristic groups associated with explosive properties. Although the substance contains a halogen, this is bound within a stable ionic structure and does not impart explosive properties to the material. The oxygen balance is not applicable to an inorganic substance, or to a substance that does not contain oxygen in its structure. Determination of the melting point of Trilithium hexafluoroaluminate by differential thermal analysis was conducted by Solvay Fluor GmbH (Küsters and Luitjens, 2013, REACH_Li3AlF6_MeIt.doc) and indicated that no exact melting point could be determined since endothermic decomposition occurs above approx. 600°C. Examination of the output trace from the Differential Scanning Calorimeter in conjunction with the Thermal Gravimetry output trace confirmed there were no exothermic events. At 428°C and 473°C (peak onset), two endothermic enthalpy peaks were recorded with an energy release value of -17.3 and -19.8 J/g, resp. An energy release value above +500 J/g can be taken as an indication that explosive behaviour is possible.

The substance is considered to not possess explosive properties and it is concluded that Trilithium hexafluoroaluminate is unlikely to undergo rapid decomposition with the production of gases or release of heat sufficient to cause damage to the surroundings, and therefore does not present a risk of explosion

Interpretation of results:
non explosive
Remarks:
Migrated information
Conclusions:
Lithium Cryolite is considered to not possess explosive properties.
Executive summary:

An expert statement on the explosive properties of Lithium cryolite has been elaborated based on the chemical structure of the material. This approach is described as acceptable in the European Council Regulation (EC) No 440/2018 of 30 May 2008 (Method A.14. ‘Explosives Properties’) and in the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (Manual of Tests and Criteria, 5th edition, 2009; Appendix 6 ‘Screening Procedures’).

Examination of the chemical structure of the substance indicates it does not contain any of the characteristic groups associated with explosive properties. Although the substance contains a halogen, this is bound within a stable ionic structure and does not impart explosive properties to the material. The oxygen balance is not applicable to an inorganic substance, or to a substance that does not contain oxygen in its structure. Determination of the melting point of Lithium cryolite by differential thermal analysis was conducted by Solvay Fluor GmbH (Küsters and Luitjens, 2013, REACH_Li3AlF6_MeIt.doc) and indicated that no exact melting point could be determined since endothermic decomposition occurs above approx. 600°C. Examination of the output trace from the Differential Scanning Calorimeter in conjunction with the Thermal Gravimetry output trace confirmed there were no exothermic events. At 428°C and 473°C (peak onset), two endothermic enthalpy peaks were recorded with an energy release value of -17.3 and -19.8 J/g, resp. An energy release value above +500 J/g can be taken as an indication that explosive behaviour is possible.

The substance is considered to not possess explosive properties and it is concluded that Lithium cryolite is unlikely to undergo rapid decomposition with the production of gases or release of heat sufficient to cause damage to the surroundings, and therefore does not present a risk of explosion

Description of key information

Lithium Cryolite is considered to not possess explosive properties. 

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Explosiveness:
non explosive

Additional information

An expert statement on the explosive properties of Lithium cryolite has been elaborated based on the chemical structure of the material. This approach is described as acceptable in the European Council Regulation (EC) No 440/2018 of 30 May 2008 (Method A.14. ‘Explosives Properties’) and in the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (Manual of Tests and Criteria, 5th edition, 2009; Appendix 6 ‘Screening Procedures’).

Examination of the chemical structure of the substance indicates it does not contain any of the characteristic groups associated with explosive properties. Although the substance contains a halogen, this is bound within a stable ionic structure and does not impart explosive properties to the material. The oxygen balance is not applicable to an inorganic substance, or to a substance that does not contain oxygen in its structure. Determination of the melting point of Lithium cryolite by differential thermal analysis was conducted by Solvay Fluor GmbH (Küsters and Luitjens, 2013, REACH_Li3AlF6_MeIt.doc) and indicated that no exact melting point could be determined since endothermic decomposition occurs above approx. 600°C. Examination of the output trace from the Differential Scanning Calorimeter in conjunction with the Thermal Gravimetry output trace confirmed there were no exothermic events. At 428°C and 473°C (peak onset), two endothermic enthalpy peaks were recorded with an energy release value of -17.3 and -19.8 J/g, resp. An energy release value above +500 J/g can be taken as an indication that explosive behaviour is possible.

The substance is considered to not possess explosive properties and it is concluded that Lithium cryolite is unlikely to undergo rapid decomposition with the production of gases or release of heat sufficient to cause damage to the surroundings, and therefore does not present a risk of explosion

Justification for classification or non-classification

Based on the chemical structure of the substance, i.e. the lack of chemical groups associated with explosive properties, as well as DTA and DSC analyses, the classification is not warranted in accordance withDirective 67/548/EEC and EU Classification, Labelling and Packaging of Substances and Mixtures (CLP) Regulation (EC) No. 1272/2008.