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Hydrolysis

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Reference
Endpoint:
hydrolysis
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 111 (Hydrolysis as a Function of pH)
GLP compliance:
yes (incl. QA statement)
Radiolabelling:
no
Preliminary study:
Assessment of the hydrolytic stability of 1,2-Ethanediamine, N-(2-aminoethyl)-, reaction products with glycidyl tolyl ether was considered not to be feasible by the regulatory methods Method C7 Abiotic Degradation, Hydrolysis as a Function of pH of Commission Regulation (EC) No 440/2008 of 30 May 2008 and Method 111 of the OECD Guidelines for Testing of Chemicals, 13 April 2004. This was as a result of the extremely complex composition and aqueous solubility characteristics of the test item.
This UVCB test item has an extremely complex composition, with information from the Sponsor indicating 20 discrete species identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. This complexity was further supported by the GLP compliant HPLC analysis performed under Envigo Research Limited study numbers LY74TL and GK43MF which addressed the water solubility, partition coefficient and adsorption coefficient of the test item.
Test performance:
The hydrolysis guidelines indicates that a minimum substance purity of 95% should be employed; although it is recognized that the methods will need to be applied to less pure substances and mixtures where there is a regulatory requirement. However in this case, the test item contains many related chemical substances, such that should hydrolysis occur, hydrolysis products may be species already present in the test item preventing accurate quantification as individual component peak are potentially depleted, increased through hydrolysis product accumulation or even show net changes from an ongoing combination of these two processes. As such, mathematical consideration of changes to the chemical composition, in terms of individual component half-lives, was considered beyond the practical scope of the regulatory methods.
The second major constraint to the study was the solubility characteristics demonstrated by the test item. Although the test item showed significant solubility for certain components, an insoluble fraction was clearly identified during evaluation of the water solubility of the test item under Envigo Research Limited Study Number LY74TL. On fortification of aqueous buffer solutions to evaluate the hydrolysis characteristics of the test item, this fraction would be expected to precipitate out of solution, introducing inconsistency and error into the sample solution compositions when compared to the parent test item. This precipitate would then also act as a potential sink for loss of soluble species through partitioning and adsorption processes. Further to this, due to the insolubility of the later eluting fraction of the test item, fortification of aqueous buffer solutions with a solution of test item in an appropriate co-solvent could introduce a significant deviation from the regulatory hydrolysis methods which require the working concentration to remain below half the water solubility of the substance under investigation.
Transformation products:
not measured
Remarks on result:
not determinable
Remarks on result:
not determinable
Details on results:
It is not possible to characterize hydrolysis as a function of pH for 1,2-Ethanediamine, N-(2-aminoethyl)-, reaction products with glycidyl tolyl ether using method C7 Abiotic Degradation, Hydrolysis as a Function of pH of Commission Regulation (EC) No 440/2008 of 30 May 2008 and Method 111 of the OECD Guidelines due to very complex composition of the substance and great variability in the components solubility.
Validity criteria fulfilled:
no
Conclusions:
It is not possible to characterize hydrolysis as a function of pH for 1,2-Ethanediamine, N-(2-aminoethyl)-, reaction products with glycidyl tolyl ether using method C7 Abiotic Degradation, Hydrolysis as a Function of pH of Commission Regulation (EC) No 440/2008 of 30 May 2008 and Method 111 of the OECD Guidelines due to very complex composition of the substance and great variability in the components solubility.
Executive summary:

It is not possible to characterize hydrolysis as a function of pH for 1,2-Ethanediamine, N-(2-aminoethyl)-, reaction products with glycidyl tolyl ether using method C7 Abiotic Degradation, Hydrolysis as a Function of pH of Commission Regulation (EC) No 440/2008 of 30 May 2008 and Method 111 of the OECD Guidelines due to very complex composition of the substance and great variability in the components solubility.

Description of key information

It is not possible to characterize hydrolysis as a function of pH for 1,2-Ethanediamine, N-(2-aminoethyl)-, reaction products with glycidyl tolyl ether using method C7 Abiotic Degradation, Hydrolysis as a Function of pH of Commission Regulation (EC) No 440/2008 of 30 May 2008 and Method 111 of the OECD Guidelines due to very complex composition of the substance and great variability in the components solubility.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information