Registration Dossier

Environmental fate & pathways

Endpoint summary

Administrative data

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Additional information

The fate and behaviour of a chemical is largely governed by its inherent physico-chemical properties, As vapour pressure, water solubility, partition coefficient (HPLC method.

The sorption or binding behaviour of chemicals to sediment is determined by certain properties. Especially substances with high Log Kow or Log Koc values adsorb to the organic fraction of the sediment and soil.

In general substances with a Koc <500-1000 L/kg are not likely sorbed to sediments (SETAC 1993).

According to this, a log Koc or log Kow of >=3 is used as trigger value for sediment effect assessment although other concentration or combinations of triggers might be important as well (e.g. binding to sediment particles) that is not Kow/Koc driven, but where for instance the distribution coefficient Kd is important, persistence in the sediment compartment. Substances with a high potential to adsorb onto sediment (e.g. log Kow >5 or Log Koc >3) require sediment assessment even at tonnages below 1000 t/y.

Substances with tonnages below 1000 t/y and a not having a high potential for adsorption (e.g.log Kow <5 or log Koc <3) do not normally need a sediment risk assessment.

The same triggers as for parent compounds (e.g. log Koc >3) can be applied to degradation products.

If it is foreseeable that degradation products accumulate in the sediment or soil compartment, testing of degradation products might be necessary. Results from biodegradability test on similar substance indicates non biodegradability in water.

The substance under evaluation is not readily biodegradable, according to the data on Similar substance 01, therefore no degradation products are expected in water compartment; the adsorption/desorpion value is low (log Koc -1.94) and the water solubility is high (159 g/L).

As conclusion, it can be assumed that the substance has not a potential adsorption property on sediment and soil compartments.