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Environmental fate & pathways

Biodegradation in water and sediment: simulation tests

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Description of key information

 Reaction mass of calcium fluoride, calcium sulfate and calcium carbonate is an inorganic compound and therefore will be not biodegraded. No studies are available

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information

Reaction mass of calcium fluoride, calcium sulfate and calcium carbonate is an inorganic substance and does not undergo biodegradation i.e. microbial degradation to carbon dioxide and water, since it doesn’t contain any carbon or hydrogen atoms in its chemical formula. Reaction mass of calcium fluoride, calcium sulfate and calcium carbonate will be degraded in the environment by means other than biodegradation. The ions will dissociate into fluoride, sulfate, carbonate and calcium ions.

Once released into the environment, calcium fluoride will ionise to a limited extent to form calcium and fluoride ions which will combine with various minerals to form a variety of other fluoride compounds. Calcium will be assimilated by species in the water and is necessary to maintain a good chemical balance in soils, water and plants, carbonate will become part of the carbon cycle, and the sulfate will become part of the sulfur cycle or be assimilated by microorganisms and other species that require sulfate as an essential substance in their biological systems/ processes. 

Therefore, biodegradation in water and sedimentation studies (simulation tests) do not need to be conducted.