Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Description of key information

Risk Characterisation
Critical Health Effects
The critical health effects for risk characterisation include, a systemic acute effect (acute toxicity from oral exposure) and a local effect (skin irritation and eye irritation).
Public Risk Characterisation
Given that there are no consumer uses identified for the chemical, it is unlikely that the public will be exposed. Hence, the public risk from this chemical is not considered to be unreasonable.
Occupational Risk Characterisation
During product formulation, oral and dermal exposure might occur, particularly where manual or open processes are used. These could include transfer and blending activities, quality control analysis, and cleaning and maintaining equipment. Worker exposure to the chemical at lower concentrations could also occur while using formulated products containing the chemical. The level and route of exposure will vary depending on the method of application and work practices employed.
Given the critical systemic long-term, systemic acute and local health effects, the chemical could pose an unreasonable risk to workers unless adequate control measures to minimise oral and dermal exposure are implemented. The chemical should be appropriately classified and labelled to ensure that a person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) at a workplace (such as an employer) has adequate information to determine the appropriate controls.

Additional information

Risk Characterisation

Critical Health Effects

The critical health effects for risk characterisation include, a systemic acute effect (acute toxicity from oral exposure) and a local effect (skin irritation and eye irritation).

Public Risk Characterisation

Given that there are no consumer uses identified for the chemical, it is unlikely that the public will be exposed. Hence, the public risk from this chemical is not considered to be unreasonable.

Occupational Risk Characterisation

During product formulation, oral and dermal exposure might occur, particularly where manual or open processes are used. These could include transfer and blending activities, quality control analysis, and cleaning and maintaining equipment. Worker exposure to the chemical at lower concentrations could also occur while using formulated products containing the chemical. The level and route of exposure will vary depending on the method of application and work practices employed.

Given the critical systemic long-term, systemic acute and local health effects, the chemical could pose an unreasonable risk to workers unless adequate control measures to minimise oral and dermal exposure are implemented. The chemical should be appropriately classified and labelled to ensure that a person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) at a workplace (such as an employer) has adequate information to determine the appropriate controls.