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Long-term toxicity to aquatic invertebrates

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Description of key information

The chemical safety assessment carried out according to Annex I of Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 does not indicate the need to investigate further the long-term toxicity to aquatic invertebrates. 

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The chemical safety assessment carried out according to Annex I of Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 does not indicate the need to investigate further the long-term toxicity to aquatic invertebrates.

There is no long-term test on aquatic invertebrates available for Fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, 2-ethylhexylesters (CAS No. 68334-05-4). The chemical safety assessment according to Annex I of Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 does not indicate the need to investigate further the long-term toxicity to aquatic invertebrates. Thus, in accordance to Annex IX, column 2 no further long-term toxicity test to aquatic invertebrates is proposed. Available short-term studies for fish, daphnia and algae, indicate no potential for aquatic toxicity (no effects up to the limit of the water solubility). Moreover, the long-term NOELR from an algal growth study and the NOEC of a fish study performed with a structurally related substance are clearly above the limit of water solubility (< 1 mg/L).  

Based on the short-term values, aquatic invertebrates cannot be identified as the most sensitive taxonomic group. According to the “Guidance on information requirements and chemical safety assessment Chapter R.7b: Endpoint specific guidance, R.7.8.5.3” (ECHA, 2012), long-term testing of aquatic invertebrates should only be conducted if it represents the most sensitive taxonomic group.

Furthermore, due to its ready biodegradability it is not likely that aquatic organisms will be exposed to Fatty acids, C18 -unsatd., dimers, 2 -ethylhexylesters since it will be ultimately degraded in sewage treatment plants and only low concentrations (if any) will be released into the environment, where further biodegradation can be expected. Based on all the above mentioned information, it is unlikely that the substance will exhibit chronic toxicity to aquatic organisms up to the limit of water solubility. Hence, based on this information, no further long-term test with aquatic invertebrates is proposed.