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Toxicological information

Direct observations: clinical cases, poisoning incidents and other

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
direct observations: clinical cases, poisoning incidents and other
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Non-standard published study

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Inhalation Of Sulfuric Acid Mist By Human Subjects
Author:
Amdur MO, Silverman L & Drinker P
Year:
1952
Bibliographic source:
Archives of Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 4, pages 305-31

Materials and methods

Study type:
study with volunteers
Endpoint addressed:
acute toxicity: inhalation
Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline available
Principles of method if other than guideline:
Investigation of the respiratory effects of sulphuric acid mist inhalation
GLP compliance:
no
Remarks:
: not applicable

Test material

Constituent 1
Chemical structure
Reference substance name:
Sulphuric acid
EC Number:
231-639-5
EC Name:
Sulphuric acid
Cas Number:
7664-93-9
Molecular formula:
H2O4S
IUPAC Name:
sulfuric acid
Details on test material:
Sulphuric acid mist

Method

Subjects:
Male (unspecified number)
Route of exposure:
inhalation
Reason of exposure:
intentional
Exposure assessment:
measured

Results and discussion

Results of examinations:
Lung retention of sulfuric-acid averaged 77 percent. Exposures to the lower concentrations of mist caused more shallow and more rapid breathing. The period of expiration was prolonged, averaging 69.3 percent of the breathing cycle versus 59.6 percent of the cycle when the subjects breathed air. At sulfuric-acid concentrations of 5mg/m3, the effects of the mist on respiration were more varied. The major response was a decrease in minute volume.

Any other information on results incl. tables

Lung retention of sulfuric-acid averaged 77 percent. Exposures to the lower concentrations of mist caused more shallow and more rapid breathing. The period of expiration was prolonged, averaging 69.3 percent of the breathing cycle versus 59.6 percent of the cycle when the subjects breathed air. At sulfuric-acid concentrations of 5mg/m3, the effects of the mist on respiration were more varied. The major response was a decrease in minute volume.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
The authors note that sulfuric-acid mists having concentrations below 3mg/m3 are not normally detectable. They conclude that respiratory changes induced by inhaling sulfuric-acid mists at concentrations on the order of 0.35mg/m3 are purely reflexive in nature. The more shallow, more rapid breathing may be a reflex protective mechanism to decrease the retention of acid mist particles.
Executive summary:

The effects of inhaling sulfuric acid mist were studied in humans. An unspecified number of normal male subjects inhaled sulfuric-acid aerosols at concentrations ranging from 0.35 to 5 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3). The subjects were at rest during the exposures and breathed through a face mask. Exposure times ranged from 5 to 15 minutes. Lung retention of sulfuric-acid was determined. The effect of the acid mist on respiration was measured by means of a pneumotachograph. Lung retention of sulfuric-acid averaged 77 percent. Exposures to the lower concentrations of mist caused more shallow and more rapid breathing. The period of expiration was prolonged, averaging 69.3 percent of the breathing cycle versus 59.6 percent of the cycle when the subjects breathed air. At sulfuric-acid concentrations of 5mg/m3, the effects of the mist on respiration were more varied. The major response was a decrease in minute volume. The authors note that sulfuric-acid mists having concentrations below 3mg/m3 are not normally detectable. They conclude that respiratory changes induced by inhaling sulfuric-acid mists at concentrations on the order of 0.35mg/m3 are purely reflexive in nature. The more shallow, more rapid breathing may be a reflex protective mechanism to decrease the retention of acid mist particles.

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