Registration Dossier

Diss Factsheets

Administrative data

Endpoint:
monitoring data
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Summary of monitoring data listed in the Environment Canada Review

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
secondary source
Title:
Canadian Environmental Protection Act, Priority Substances List II: Supporting Document for Ammonia in the Aquatic Environment.
Author:
Constable, M., Jensen, F., McLeron, J., Craig, G., Moore, D.
Year:
1999
Bibliographic source:
Draft, Unpublished Version. Government of Canada, Environment Canada

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline followed
Principles of method if other than guideline:
The SIDS summarises the above paper giving monitoring data for air, soil, groundwater and surfacewater.
GLP compliance:
not specified
Type of measurement:
background concentration
Media:
other: air, soil, groundwater and surfacewater.

Test material

Constituent 1
Chemical structure
Reference substance name:
Ammonia, anhydrous
EC Number:
231-635-3
EC Name:
Ammonia, anhydrous
Cas Number:
7664-41-7
Molecular formula:
H3N
IUPAC Name:
ammonia
Details on test material:
Ammonia

Study design

Details on sampling:
No information available

Results and discussion

Concentrationopen allclose all
Location:
worldwide
Substance or metabolite:
substance
Conc.:
20 pg/m³ air
Remarks on result:
other: atmospheric worldwide mean levels
Location:
worldwide nonurban sites
Substance or metabolite:
substance
Conc.:
4 - 5 pg/m³ air
Remarks on result:
other: atmospheric worldwide mean levels
Location:
areas close to point sources (e.g. large animal feedlots or industrial sites)
Substance or metabolite:
substance
Conc.:
> 200 pg/m³ air
Remarks on result:
other: local atmospheric levels
Location:
soil
Substance or metabolite:
substance
Conc.:
< 1 other: mg/kg
Remarks on result:
other: natural levels
Country:
Canada
Location:
Canadian surface waters
Substance or metabolite:
substance
Conc.:
0.001 - 2 mg/L
Remarks on result:
other: Environmental concentrations for total ammonia
Details on results:
See below.

Any other information on results incl. tables

Air

Atmospheric levels of ammonia in urban areas around the world are on average about 20 pg/m3. Non-urban sites have average levels of 4-5pg/m3.  Areas close to point sources (e.g., large animal feedlots or industrial sites) may have local atmospheric concentrations exceeding 200pg/m3.

Soil

Limited data are available on the concentrations of ammonia in soil. In general, natural levels in soil are low (< 1 mg/kg) because of the rapid conversion of ammonia to nitrite and nitrate by Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter, respectively. Several studies have been conducted to measure conditions in the injection zone following the field application of anhydrous ammonia (see p. 104 of cited reference). These studies commonly show in excess of 1000 mg/L of ammonia nitrogen and a pH more than 9.0 in the center of the injection zone. These effects rapidly decrease as the distance from the injection point increases, e.g., at 7 cm the ammonium concentration and pH levels are not usually above background.

Groundwater

Ammonia contamination of groundwater is not an issue as it is readily converted to positively charged ammonium ions that bind tightly to negatively charged cation exchange sites in the soil.

Surfacewater

Natural waters typically contain ammonia and ammonia compounds in concentrations below 0.1 mg/L (as nitrogen). Environmental concentrations for total ammonia in Canadian surface waters range from < 0.001 mg/L to 2.00 mg/L. Extensive elaboration of these data is found in the cited reference.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Executive summary:

Air

Atmospheric levels of ammonia in urban areas around the world are on average about 20pg/m3. Non-urban sites have average levels of 4-5pg/m3.  Areas close to point sources (e.g., large animal feedlots or industrial sites) may have local atmospheric concentrations exceeding 200pg/m3.

Soil

Limited data are available on the concentrations of ammonia in soil. In general, natural levels in soil are low (< 1 mg/kg) because of the rapid conversion of ammonia to nitrite and nitrate by Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter, respectively. Several studies have been conducted to measure conditions in the injection zone following the field application of anhydrous ammonia (see p. 104 of cited reference). These studies commonly show in excess of 1000 mg/L of ammonia nitrogen and a pH more than 9.0 in the center of the injection zone. These effects rapidly decrease as the distance from the injection point increases, e.g., at 7 cm the ammonium concentration and pH levels are not usually above background.

Groundwater

Ammonia contamination of groundwater is not an issue as it is readily converted to positively charged ammonium ions that bind tightly to negatively charged cation exchange sites in the soil.

Surfacewater

Natural waters typically contain ammonia and ammonia compounds in concentrations below 0.1 mg/L (as nitrogen). Environmental concentrations for total ammonia in Canadian surface waters range from < 0.001 mg/L to 2.00 mg/L. Extensive elaboration of these data is found in the cited reference.