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Toxicological information

Sensitisation data (human)

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
sensitisation data (humans)
Type of information:
migrated information: read-across based on grouping of substances (category approach)
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
4 (not assignable)

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
No information
Author:
Baer RL
Year:
1973
Bibliographic source:
J Allergy Clin. Immunol. 51:35-8

Materials and methods

Type of sensitisation studied:
skin
Study type:
case report
Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline followed
GLP compliance:
no

Test material

Constituent 1
Reference substance name:
Iron trichloride
EC Number:
231-729-4
EC Name:
Iron trichloride
Cas Number:
7705-08-0
IUPAC Name:
iron(3+) trichloride
Details on test material:
- Name of test material (as cited in study report): Ferric chloride 2 % aqueous solution

Method

Ethical approval:
not specified
Subjects:
- Number of subjects exposed: 1
- Sex: Male
- Age: 66
- Race: white
Clinical history:
- History of allergy or casuistics for study subject or populations: from 1972 to 1967 healthy man developed allergic reaction.
- Symptoms, onset and progress of the disease: itchy eruption on the ankles and legs. This subsequently spread to the upper parts of the legs, hands, arms and trunk.
- Exposure history: the patient was a toolmaker who used the lathe and did bench work, such as machining, shaping and cutting. In the course of these activities metal dust came off, which settled in his shoes and socks. The cutting oil used also became heavily contaminated with metal dust. In addition to cast iron, he used brass, aluminium, copper and steel. He changed into his work clothes, which were washed only once a week, in the morning and back into other clothing in the afternoon.
- Aggravating factors both in home and workplace: the eruption, which was usually worse during the winter months, as occurring in patches and consisting of small water blisters. The eruption had not cleared completely at any time during this period, even though he had been treated with various topical medications and with systemic corticosteroids.
Route of administration:
dermal
Details on study design:
TYPE OF TEST(S) USED: patch test (epicutaneous test); prick test; RAST; other immunological tests:

ADMINISTRATION
- Type of application: no data
- Description of patch: with 11 different metals in appropriate dilutions
- Vehicle / solvent: water
- Concentrations: 2 % aqueous solution of ferric chloride
- Volume applied: no data
- Testing/scoring schedule: no data
- Removal of test substance: no data


EXAMINATIONS
- Grading/Scoring system: no data
- Statistical analysis: no data

Results and discussion

Results of examinations:
Contact sensitization to iron and positive patch test to a 2% ferric chloride solution were reported in a 66-year old white male tool maker. The patient's 5 -year history of allergic contact dermatitis was not associated with any other exposure to metals.

Any other information on results incl. tables

Table

 Substances applied  Date of first reading(7-Mar-1972)  Date of second reading(9-Mar-1972)
 Nickel sulfate 2 % aqueous solution  0  0
 Cobalt sulfate 2 % aqueous solution (nickel free)  0  0
 Chromium chloride 2 % aqueous solution  0  0
 Ferric chloride 2 % aqueous solution  0  3+
 Silver nitrate 2 % aqueous solution  0  0
 Zinc chloride 2 % aqueous solution  0  0
 Gold chloride 0.5% aqueous solution 0  1
 Copper sulfate 5 % aqueous solution  0  0
 Manganese chloride 2 % aqueous solution  0  0
 Nickel sulfate 5 % aqueous solution  0  0
 Potassium dichromate 0.5 % aqueous solution  0  0
 Aluminium chloride 5 % aqueous solution  0  0

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Contact sensitization to iron and positive patch test to a 2% ferric chloride solution were reported in a 66-year old white male tool maker. The patient's 5 -year history of allergic contact dermatitis was not associated with any other exposure to metals.
Executive summary:

A case is reported of allergic contact dermatitis due to iron in a toolmaker. Patch tests were performed on this patient with 11 different metals in appropriate dilutions. At the time of the 24 hour reading all tests were negative, but at 72 hour reading a strongly positive reaction to ferric chloride 2 % aqueous solution was seen. The morphologic changes at this positive patch test were identical with the lesions of the widerspread clinical eruption. Considering history, chlinical changes and patch test results, the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis due to iron was considered established.