Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Endpoint:
additional ecotoxicological information
Type of information:
other: survey of vegetation near manufacture sites
Adequacy of study:
disregarded due to major methodological deficiencies
Reliability:
4 (not assignable)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: The data provided in this report are not sufficient to assess the quality and reliability of the study.

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
secondary source
Title:
Report on coniferous vegetation collected in Union Count and Magnolia area, Arkansas
Author:
Gordon CC
Year:
1976
Bibliographic source:
Unpublished report cited in US Chemical Hazard Information Profile (CHIP)

Materials and methods

Results and discussion

Any other information on results incl. tables

In 1976, vegetation in the locale of bromine production from brine extraction in the El Dorado-Magnolia, Arkansas, USA was severely affected. The first noted manifestation of a problem was damage to coniferous trees near the bromine production sites. Needle tip necrosis after 13 to 14 month and 1 to 2 month exposure time was evident within a 3 mile radius of all bromine facilities sampled in the area. At distances further from the plants (3.5 to 12 miles, tip damage was sporadic, vaying from tree to tree and not evident on 1 to 2 month exposure needles. The foliage burn and death of trees within 0.5 to 1 mile of each plant site was extreme. Conifers were decidedly more susceptible to bromine emissions than were broadleaf trees, shrubs and grasses. Chlorophyll (a and b) levels were greatly reduced in the conifer trees surrounding the bromine plants.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Exposure to bromine vapors is harmful to terrestrial plants, with conifers more susceptible than broadleaf trees, shrubs and grasses. Needle tip necrosis was a first manifestation near bromine production from brine extraction.
Executive summary:

In 1976, vegetation in the locale of bromine production from brine extraction in the El Dorado-Magnolia, Arkansas, USA was severely affected. The first noted manifestation of a problem was damage to coniferous trees near the bromine production sites. Needle tip necrosis after 13 to 14 month and 1 to 2 month exposure time was evident within a 3 mile radius of all bromine facilities sampled in the area. At distances further from the plants (3.5 to 12 miles, tip damage was sporadic, vaying from tree to tree and not evident on 1 to 2 month exposure needles. The foliage burn and death of trees within 0.5 to 1 mile of each plant site was extreme. Conifers were decidedly more susceptible to bromine emissions than were broadleaf trees, shrubs and grasses. Chlorophyll (a and b) levels were greatly reduced in the conifer trees surrounding the bromine plants.