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Administrative data

Description of key information

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Skin sensitisation

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
no adverse effect observed (not sensitising)
Additional information:

No evidence of skin sensitisation was seen in a GLP- and guideline-compliant Buehler study performed with a mixture of chromium hydroxide sulphate and sodium sulphate. The Buehler method is considered to be appropriate given the low dermal penetration of this substance.

Skin sensitisation of chromium (VI) compounds

It is generally considered that chromium (III) is the active hapten for the chromium (VI) sensitisation which is well recognised and a number of studies with trivalent chromium salts using induction by injection have shown positive results. Therefore it is shown that Cr(III) compounds are much less potent skin sensitisers than Cr(VI) compounds; this difference in potency is attributable to the very low dermal penetration of Cr (III) salts. There are a small number of literaure studies which identify skin sensitisation in tannery workers exposed to basic chromuium sulphate and also in the general population follwoing close dermal contact to chrome-tanned leather products such as shoes. These cases may concern induction or elicitation, due to leaching of low levels of hexavalent or higher levels of trivalent chromium from the leather. However it is unclear whether these cases involved concomitant exposure to low levels of Cr (VI) contaminants or resulted from cross-reactivity between Cr (III) and Cr (VI). It can be concluded that Cr (III) compounds are probably capable of eliciting sensitisation reactions, but that the potency is very low and that it is related to water solubility. Chromium hydroxide sulphate is of relatively low water solubility and therefore is likely to have a very low skin sensitisation potency. This is supported by the clearly negative response seen in the guideline Buehler study performed with the substance.


Migrated from Short description of key information:
No evidence of skin sensitisation was seen in a GLP- and guideline-compliant Buehler study performed with a mixture of chromium hydroxide sulphate and sodium sulphate.

Respiratory sensitisation

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
no adverse effect observed (not sensitising)
Additional information:

The availiable animal data and extensive occupational use of Cr (III) compounds and basic chromium sulphate specifically does not cause respiratory sensitisation (occupational asthma).


Migrated from Short description of key information:
There is no clear evidence in the literature that Cr (III) compounds are respiratory sensitisers.

Justification for classification or non-classification

Chromium hydroxide sulphate is not classified as a skin sensitiser based on the results of the clearly negative guideline-compliant Buehler study. Studies in the literature indicates that Cr (III) compounds have the potential to cause skin sensitisation, but that this potential is limited by very low dermal penetration. There is no clear evidence that chromium hydroxide sulphate causes skin sensitisation in humans as, in the limited reports available, contamination with or cross-reaction with Cr (VI) compounds cannot be excluded.

Chromium hydroxide sulphate is not classified as a respiratory sensitiser based on an absence of reports of occupational asthma following extensive use.

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