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Ecotoxicological information

Toxicity to terrestrial plants

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
toxicity to terrestrial plants: short-term
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: study well documented, meets generally accepted scientific principles

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Die Wirkung von organischen Substanzen (Lösemitteln) in der Gasphase auf höhere Pflanzen.
Author:
Christ RA
Year:
1996
Bibliographic source:
Gefahrstoffe -Reinhaltung der Luft 56, 345-350 (1996)

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline followed
Principles of method if other than guideline:
Higher plants were fumigated with organic solvents (e.g. dimethyl carbonate) in cuvettes for 3 h and the visible damage symptoms, the rate of photosynthesis, transpiration, and leaf growth recorded.
GLP compliance:
not specified

Test material

Constituent 1
Chemical structure
Reference substance name:
Dimethyl carbonate
EC Number:
210-478-4
EC Name:
Dimethyl carbonate
Cas Number:
616-38-6
Molecular formula:
C3H6O3
IUPAC Name:
dimethyl carbonate

Sampling and analysis

Analytical monitoring:
no

Test substrate

Vehicle:
no

Test organisms

open allclose all
Species:
Beta vulgaris
Species:
Glycine max (G. soja)
Species:
Helianthus annuus
Species:
Lycopersicon esculentum
Species:
Phaseolus vulgaris
Species:
Triticum aestivum
Species:
other: Tropaeolum majus

Study design

Test type:
other: investigation of damage symptoms of leaves, rate of photosynthesis, transpiration and leaf growth
Study type:
laboratory study
Substrate type:
other: fumigation
Limit test:
no
Total exposure duration:
3 h

Test conditions

Test temperature:
in winter:25°C
in summer: 35°C
Details on test conditions:
TEST SYSTEM
- Test container (type, material, size): cuvette (volume: 260 L), mineral glass
- No. of plant pots per container: 6-8
- No. of plants (retained after thinning): not reported
- No. of replicates per treatment group: 1
- No. of replicates per control: 1

GROWTH CONDITIONS: not reported

EFFECT PARAMETERS MEASURED (with observation intervals if applicable): damage symptoms of leaves, rate of photosynthesis, transpiration, and leaf growth

TEST CONCENTRATIONS: not reported
Reference substance (positive control):
yes
Remarks:
HCl, NH3, and SO2

Results and discussion

Effect concentrationsopen allclose all
Species:
other: higher plants
Duration:
3 h
Dose descriptor:
LOEC
Effect conc.:
3 000 other: mg/m³
Nominal / measured:
nominal
Conc. based on:
test mat.
Basis for effect:
other: photosynthesis
Remarks on result:
other: average value for the 6 tested plants
Species:
other: higher plants
Duration:
3 h
Dose descriptor:
LOEC
Effect conc.:
10 000 other: mg/m³
Nominal / measured:
nominal
Conc. based on:
test mat.
Basis for effect:
other: visible damage symptoms of leaves
Remarks on result:
other: average value for the 6 tested plants

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Validity criteria fulfilled:
not applicable
Conclusions:
In 3 h fumigation tests with DMC, the limit concentrations (average of the 6 tested higher plants) were determined to be 10 g DMC/m³ and 3 g/m³ in respect to visible damage symptoms and photosynhesis, respectively. According to the classification of the author, DMC belongs to the class of substances being less hazardous.
Executive summary:

The effect of organic solvents as air pollutants on higher plants was investigated. For this purpose, 6 higher plants (Beta vulgaris, Glycine maxima, Helianthus annus, Lycopersicum esculentum, Phaseolus vulgaris, Triticum aestivum, and Tropaeolum majus) were fumigated with e.g. dimethyl carbonate (DMC) in cuvettes for 3 h and the visible damage symptoms of the leaves, the rate of photosynthesis, transpiration, and leaf growth recorded. The limit concentrations (average of the 6 tested higher plants) were determined to be 10 g DMC/m³ and 3 g/m³ in respect to visible damage symptoms and photosynhesis, respectively. According to the classification of the author, DMC belongs to the class of substances being less hazardous.