Registration Dossier

Environmental fate & pathways

Other distribution data

Currently viewing:

Administrative data

Endpoint:
other distribution data
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
4 (not assignable)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Onlay secondary spurce available

Data source

Referenceopen allclose all

Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Organic chemicals in the environment. Fate of volatile and semivolatile organic chemicals in soil: Abiotic versus biotic losses
Author:
Anderson TA, Beauchamp JJ, & Walton BT
Year:
1991
Bibliographic source:
J Environ Qual 20:420-4
Reference Type:
secondary source
Title:
Environmental Health Criteria 208 CARBON TETRACHLORIDE
Author:
de Fouw J
Year:
1999
Bibliographic source:
ISBN 92 4 157208 6, ISSN 0250-863X, self-published WHO, Geneva, Switzerland, 199p http://www.inchem.org/documents/ehc/ehc/ehc208.htm
Reference Type:
secondary source
Title:
Environmental Hazard Assessment: Carbon Tetrachloride: Toxic Substances Division
Author:
Willis B, Rea JD, Crookes MJ, Howe PD, Dobson SD
Year:
1994
Bibliographic source:
ISBN - 0 85125 622 8 - Directorate for Air, Climate and Toxic Substances, Department of the Environment TSD/21, 57p

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
The loss of carbon tetrachloride from two different soil types was determined. CTC was applied to the soil (in a mixture with 14 other compounds) at a concentration of 100 mg/kg (dry weight) and the soil was incubated in the dark at 20 °C for 7 days.
Type of study:
volatility
Media:
soil - air

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent

Results and discussion

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
CTC is volatilized from soils with a DT 50 of about 5 days.
Executive summary:

Anderson et al (1991) studied the loss of CTC from two different oil types, a silt loam 1.49% organic carbon) and a sandy loam (0.66% organic carbon). CTC was applied to the soil (in a mixture with 14 other compounds) at a concentration of 100 mg/kg (dry weight) and the soil was incubated in the dark at 20 °C for 7 days. The half-life for disappearance of CTC in both sterile and non-sterile systems was around 5 days, indicating that volatilization was the likely removal process.