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Description of key information

Short description of key information on bioaccumulation potential result: 
No bioaccumulation potential is expected as can be derived from physicochemical properties
Short description of key information on absorption rate:
Estimation of dermal adsorption is based on relevant available information (mainly water solubility and log Kow) and expert judgement is proposed

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Bioaccumulation potential:
no bioaccumulation potential
Absorption rate - dermal (%):
10

Additional information

In general, a compound needs to be dissolved before it can be taken up from the gastro-intestinal tract after oral administration (1). The relatively small molecular weight (~210 g/mol) and the high water solubility (≥1000 g/L) indicates that uptake of Triethanol amineacetate can take place through aqueous pores. It is therefore likely that Triethanol amineacetate will be absorbed from the gastro-intestinal tract. For risk assessment purposes oral absorption of Triethanol amineacetate is set at 100%.

Once absorbed, distribution of Triethanol amineacetate throughout the body is expected based on its relatively low molecular weight, and no accumulation in the body is anticipated based on its hydrophilic character. Triethanol amineacetate has characteristics favourable for fast urinary excretion: low molecular weight (below 300 g/mol) and good water solubility. Based on its hydrophilic character, extracellular concentration is also expected to be higher than intracellular concentration. The rate at which this highly water-soluble molecule distributes may be limited by the rate at which it crosses cell membranes and access of this substance to the central nervous system (CNS) or testes is likely to be restricted by the blood-brain and blood-testes barriers.

Due to the low vapour pressure (1.16 x 10-1 Pa) of the substance it is not to be expected that Triethanol amineacetate will reach the nasopharyncheal region or subsequently the tracheobronchial or pulmonary region. As a very hydrophilic substance with a relatively low molecular weight, any Triethanol amineacetate reaching the lungs might be absorbed through aqueous pores or be retained in the mucus and transported out of the respiratory tract. Overall, although it is unlikely that Triethanol amineacetate will be available to a high extent after inhalation via the lungs due to the low vapour pressure. For risk assessment purposes the inhalation absorption of Triethanol amineacetate is set at 100%.

Triethanol amineacetate with water solubility above 10 g/l and the log P value below 0 may be too hydrophilic to cross the lipid rich environment of the stratum corneum. 10% dermal absorption of Triethanol amineacetate is proposed for risk assessment purposes.

Discussion on bioaccumulation potential result:

Once absorbed, distribution of Triethanol amineacetate throughout the body is expected based on its relatively low molecular weight, and no accumulation in the body is anticipated based on its hydrophilic character. Triethanol amineacetate has characteristics favourable for fast urinary excretion: low molecular weight (below 300 g/mol) and good water solubility.

Discussion on absorption rate:

Triethanol amineacetate with water solubility above 10 g/l and the log P value below 0 may be too hydrophilic to cross the lipid rich environment of the stratum corneum. 10% dermal absorption of Triethanol amineacetate is proposed for risk assessment purposes.