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Toxicological information

Direct observations: clinical cases, poisoning incidents and other

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
direct observations: clinical cases, poisoning incidents and other
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
other information
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Acceptable publication

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Absorption of Some Glycol Ethers Through Human Skin in Vitro
Author:
Dugard, P.H. et al.
Year:
1984
Bibliographic source:
Environ. Health Perspect. 57, 193-197

Materials and methods

Study type:
other: skin permeability measurements
Principles of method if other than guideline:
Method: other: in vitro permeability measurements in human skin
GLP compliance:
not specified

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
Name of the test substance as stated in the publication: 2-ethoxyethanol;
purchased from: ICI Petrochemicals and Plastics Division (Wilton UK);
purity: > 98 %

Results and discussion

Any other information on results incl. tables

The absorption of the test substance achieved maximum steady rates within the experimental period (8 hr). 2 -ethoxyethanol was readily absorbed.

Skin absorption of 2 -ethoxyethanol:

 Compound  Permeability constant, cm/hr x 10^4  Rate of absorption, mg/cm²/hr  Damage ratio  Approx. lag time, hr
 2 -ethoxyethanol  8.42  0.796 +/-0.460 (n=11)  2.74 +/-1.46 (n=10)  <1

The damage ratio is the ratio of skin permeability to tritiated water after contact with the test compound to that recorded before such

contact. Some slight degree of irreversible damage has been induced by the test substance but this is unlikely to have had a significant

effect on permeability (Control damage ratio values for water contact alone lay between 1.0 and 2.0).

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
In an in-vitro experiment the absorption of the test substance 2 -ethoxyethanol across isolated human abdominal epidermis was measured. Some slight degree of irreversible damage has been induced by the test substance but this is unlikely to have had a significant effect on permeability.