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Short-term toxicity to aquatic invertebrates

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Description of key information

One study rated  Klimisch validity 2 has been selected as key study (Kamaya et al., 2005), since conducted similarly to standardised guidelines and with buffered test solutions. This study led to a 48H-EC50 of 870 mg/l. 

Key value for chemical safety assessment

EC50/LC50 for freshwater invertebrates:
870 mg/L

Additional information

One study rated Klimisch validity 2 has been selected as key study (Kamaya et al., 2005). This study led to a 48H-EC50 of 870 mg/l.

Because of uncertainties on Henschel et al. (1997) data, this has been put in reliability 3 and has not been selected as supporting study. Indeed, the test solutions were not buffered and even if it was indicated that "usual pH values were found in the concentration ranges around the EC50 values", it was not possible to assess how this pH effect may have impacted the calculation of the EC50 value since no information was available on the concentrations tested.

Four other relevant supporting studies of Klimisch validity 2 are also available and listed below:

- a study following OECD guideline 202 "Daphnia sp. acute immobilization test" (Wang and Lay, 1989) => EC50-24h = 230 mg/L (pH = 6.5)

- a study following a french standardized method AFNOR T90301(Dion and Decros, 1984) => 24h-EC50 = 180mg/L at pH 2,3 and 24h-EC50> 1500mg/L at pH 7

- another study following a french standardized method AFNOR T90301 (Palla and Dion, 1983) => 24h-EC50 between 100 (pH=6,5) and 350 mg/L (pH=2,6)

- a study similar to OECD guideline 202 (Bringmann and Kühn, 1982) => 24h-EC50 = 105mg/L and 24h-EC100= 113mg/L (non neutralized solution) 24h EC100>1440mg/L (neutralized solution)

These studies were all performed on 24h of exposure instead as 48h as requested in the OECD guideline, but they were still considered as reliable with restrictions because they support the result obtained in the key study. Moreover, two of these studies have been performed with and without pH adjustment of the test medium. When comparing the results obtained, the effects observed at lower concentrations (i.e. 100 -200 mg/L) can be attributed to the pH instead of the toxic properties of salicylic acid.

Conclusion :

All these studies support the key study for the indication of no hazard of salicylic acid to aquatic invertebrates.

These studies also demonstrate the physical acid effect of non buffered test solution of salicylic acid.