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Toxicological information

Eye irritation

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
eye irritation: in vivo
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
1980
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: The study was not conducted according to guideline/s and GLP but the report contains sufficient data for interpretation of study results
Cross-referenceopen allclose all
Reason / purpose for cross-reference:
reference to same study
Reason / purpose for cross-reference:
reference to other study

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
study report
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
1980
Report date:
1980

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
equivalent or similar to guideline
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 405 (Acute Eye Irritation / Corrosion)
Principles of method if other than guideline:
See below
GLP compliance:
no

Test material

Constituent 1
Chemical structure
Reference substance name:
Reaction mass of divinylbenzene and ethylstyrene
EC Number:
910-757-7
Cas Number:
N/A
Molecular formula:
Divinylbenzene: C10H10 Ethylstyrene: C10H12
IUPAC Name:
Reaction mass of divinylbenzene and ethylstyrene
Details on test material:
It is a mixture of meta and para divinyl benzene (70-85%), with the balance ethyl vinyl benzene.

Test animals / tissue source

Species:
rabbit
Strain:
New Zealand White
Details on test animals or tissues and environmental conditions:
Male New Zealand albino rabbits (Langshaw Farms, Augusta, Michigan).

Test system

Vehicle:
unchanged (no vehicle)
Controls:
no
Amount / concentration applied:
0.1 ml
Duration of treatment / exposure:
once, right eye 30 second exposure and then washed, left eye test material instilled and unwashed
Observation period (in vivo):
21 days
Number of animals or in vitro replicates:
1
Details on study design:
The test procedure consisted of instillation of ~0.1 ml of undiluted test material into the conjunctival sac of the right eye. Following a 30 second exposure period the eye was washed for 2 minutes with tepid, flowing tap water. The test material was then instilled in a similar manner in the left eye which was left unwashed. At various time intervals both eyes were examined for conjunctival irritation, corneal injury and irritation of the iris. Th behavior of the animals was observed for indications of pain or discomfort. All eyes were examined following instillation, 1 hour, 24 hours, 48 hours and at intervals of 7 days post-instillation. A drop of 5% aqueous fluorescein was used to help assess corneal injury at the 1-hour reading and at all subsequent readings.

Results and discussion

In vivo

Results
Irritation parameter:
overall irritation score
Basis:
mean
Time point:
other: 24, 48 and 72 hours
Score:
0
Reversibility:
fully reversible within: all signs of eye irritation disappeared within 1 hour post exposure
Irritant / corrosive response data:
Instillation of this material into the eyes of a rabbit resulted in slight discomfort and transient very slight conjunctival redness. All signs of
eye irritation were essentially absent by 1 hour post-exposure. Very slight signs of eye irritation observed after this time were felt to be
spontaneous in nature and unrelated to application of the test material.
Other effects:
None

Any other information on results incl. tables

Safety glasses should suffice whenever the likelihood of human eye contact exists. If contact does occur, contaminated eyes should be flushed with plenty of water.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Interpretation of results:
not irritating
Remarks:
Migrated information Criteria used for interpretation of results: EU
Conclusions:
Instillation of this material into the eyes of a rabbit resulted in slight discomfort and transient very slight conjunctival redness. All signs of
eye irritation were essentially absent by 1 hour post-exposure. No classification is required according to EU criteria.
Executive summary:

A sample of divinyl benzene - HP (70-85) was submitted to the Toxicology Research Laboratory on April 7, 1980, for acute toxicological evaluation and definition of industrial handling hazards. The source of this light yellow liquid is Functional Products and Systems Technical Service and Development, Midland, Michigan. It is a mixture of meta and para divinyl benzene (70-85%), with the balance ethyl vinyl benzene. It is an ion exchange raw material and has a proposed use in unsaturated polyester formulations.

Acute oral toxicity tests were conducted on male CDF (Fischer 344 - derived) albino rats (Charles River Breeding Laboratories, Inc., Portage, Michigan), 99-138g, while eye and skin iritation tests were conducted on male New Zealand albino rabbits (Langshaw Farms, Augusta, Michigan).

The acute oral toxicity of this material is low. The single-dose oral LD50 for male rats is 2155 mg/kg (1494-3426 mg/kg, 95:; confidence interval) when calculated by the moving average method of analysis. Rats received the following doses of the undiluted test material by single-dose oral gavage (number dead per number treated is in parentheses): 630 ( 0 / 6 ) , 1300 (1/6), 2500 (3/6) or 5000 mglkg (6/6). Following dosage, all rats on test were lethargic and had piloerection (rough hair coats). In addition, rats of the 1300-1500 mg/kg groups exhibited decreased food consumption. All surviving rats gained weight during the 2-week post-treatment observation period, and no treatment related effects were observed upon gross pathological examination of all survivors 2 weeks post-treatment. No problem is anticipated from human ingestion of this material incidental to industrial handling.

Instillation of this material into the eyes of a rabbit resulted in slight discomfort and transient very slight conjunctival redness. All signs of eye irritation were essentially absent by 1 hour post-exposure. Very slight signs of eye irritation observed after this time were felt to be spontaneous in nature and unrelated to application of the test material. Safety glasses should suffice whenever the likelihood of human eye contact exists. If contact does occur, contaminated eyes should be flushed with plenty of water.

Repeated contact with this material on unconfined rabbit skin resulted in slight redness, slight swelling, slight exfoliation, and, after 10 applications, a moderate burn which resulted i n scar formation. Contact on confined skin resulted in marked redness, slight to moderate swelling, moderate exfoliation, and, after 3 applications , a moderate burn which resulted in scar formation. Prolonged and repeated human skin contact with this material should be avoided. If contact does occur, contaminated skin should be washed thoroughly with soap and plenty of water. Contaminated clothing and shoes should be cleaned thoroughly before reuse or discarded. This

relatively short skin exposure revealed no indication that the material is absorbed through the skin in acutely toxic amounts. It is believed that systemic injury will not occur at concentrations of the material that will not produce local skin injury.