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Administrative data

Endpoint:
acute toxicity: dermal
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
1973
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: The study was not conducted according to guideline/s and GLP but the report contains sufficient data for interpretation of study results
Cross-reference
Reason / purpose for cross-reference:
reference to same study

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
study report
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
1973
Report date:
1973

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
equivalent or similar to guideline
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 402 (Acute Dermal Toxicity)
Principles of method if other than guideline:
see below
GLP compliance:
no
Test type:
standard acute method
Limit test:
no

Test material

Constituent 1
Chemical structure
Reference substance name:
Reaction mass of divinylbenzene and ethylstyrene
EC Number:
910-757-7
Cas Number:
N/A
Molecular formula:
Divinylbenzene: C10H10 Ethylstyrene: C10H12
IUPAC Name:
Reaction mass of divinylbenzene and ethylstyrene
Details on test material:
Vapor phase chromatograph (VPC) analysis :
Divinylbenzene 55.7%, Ethylvinylbenzene 40.4%, Diethylbenzene 4.5%, Mass 144-146 1.7%, Naphthalene 0.4%, t-Butyl Catechol 1010 ppm, Polymer 4 ppm

The percentage was determined by measuring the percent area of each component shown in the vapor phase chromatograph and is
considered to be approximately equal to weight percent.

Test animals

Species:
rabbit
Strain:
not specified
Sex:
male/female
Details on test animals or test system and environmental conditions:
No data

Administration / exposure

Type of coverage:
occlusive
Vehicle:
unchanged (no vehicle)
Details on dermal exposure:
Twenty-four hours prior to applying the test compound, the entire trunk of twelve rabbits, six males and six females, was clipped free of hair with electric clippers. Doses of 2.0, 3.98 or 7.95 g/kg body weight of the liquid were applied to the skin of the rabbits under a heavy gauge plastic cuff. The cuff was held in place with rubber bands and a cloth bandage taped securely to the marginal hair. Two animals of each sex were used per dose level. At the end of the 24 hour exposure period , the cuffs were removed and the skin was washed with soap and water, rinsed thoroughly and dried with a cloth towel.
Duration of exposure:
24 hours
Doses:
2.0, 3.98 or 7.95 g/kg body weight
No. of animals per sex per dose:
2/sex/dose
Control animals:
no
Details on study design:
Twenty-four hours prior to applying the test compound, the entire trunk of twelve rabbits, six males and six females, was clipped free of hair with electric clippers. Doses of 2.0, 3.98 or 7.95 g/kg body weight of the liquid were applied to the skin of the rabbits under a heavy gauge plastic cuff. The cuff was held in place with rubber bands and a cloth bandage taped securely to the marginal hair. Two animals of each sex were used per dose level. At the end of the 24 hour exposure period , the cuffs were removed and the skin was washed with soap and water, rinsed thoroughly and dried with a cloth towel. The animals were observed for signs of toxicity during the exposure and periodically for two weeks thereafter. Body weights were recorded before and after the 24 hour exposure and at intervals up to 2 weeks post-application or until any initial loss of body weight was regained.
Statistics:
No data

Results and discussion

Effect levels
Sex:
male/female
Dose descriptor:
LD50
Effect level:
8 other: g/kg
95% CL:
4.5 - 11.8
Remarks on result:
other: The LD50 was calculated * to be 8.0 g/kg (95% Confidence Limits 4.5 to 11.8 g/kg) with the assumption that a dose of 15.8 g/kg would kill 100% of the animals.
Mortality:
Application of the test material to rabbits in the manner described resulted in death of two of the four animals at the 7.95 g/kg dosage level. Death of these animals occurred on the third day after dosing. All other animals survived.
Clinical signs:
None
Body weight:
Surviving animals lost weight after exposure and returned to starting weight levels slowly.
Gross pathology:
None
Other findings:
None

Any other information on results incl. tables

The material is not likely to be absorbed through the skin in acutely toxic amounts. Prolonged and/or repeated skin contact should be avoided. If contact occurs, the skin should be decontaminated with soap and water and contaminated clothing thoroughly cleaned before re-use.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Interpretation of results:
not classified
Remarks:
Migrated information Criteria used for interpretation of results: EU
Conclusions:
The LD50 was calculated to be 8.0 g/kg (95% Confidence Limits 4.5 to 11.8 g/kg).
Executive summary:

SUMMARY: A sample of divinylbenzene (DVB) was submitted to Chemical Biology Research for evaluation of acute oral

lethality, eye and skin irritation properties, and for definition of industrial handling hazards.

The acute oral lethality of the test material is low. There is little likelihood that internal injury would result from acute

ingestion of mounts of the material one might encounter incidental to industrial handling.

Eye contact with the test material would likely result in severe pain and slight conjunctival inflammation. Safety glasses are

recommended whenever the likelihood of eye contact exists.

Prolonged skin contact with the test material would likely result in slight redness and slight swelling. However, if contact is

repeated and/or contaminated clothing is worn for -several days, a slight chemical burn and scaling may also occur. The

material is not likely to be absorbed through the skin in acutely toxic amounts. Prolonged and/or repeated skin contact should

be avoided. If contact occurs, the skin should be decontaminated with soap and water and contaminated clothing thoroughly

cleaned before re-use.

No problem is anticipated from a single, short-term exposure to the vapors or fumes of the compound generated at ambient

conditions. However, the vapor or fumes generated at elevated temperatures may present a definite health hazard and

inhalation exposure should be avoided. The effects of repeated exposure to divinylbenzene vapors cannot be evaluated on the

basis of data collected thus far.