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Toxicological information

Dermal absorption

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
dermal absorption
Type of information:
read-across based on grouping of substances (category approach)
Adequacy of study:
weight of evidence
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Well documented, scientifically acceptable publication For justification of read across please refer to section 13.

Data source

Referenceopen allclose all

Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Penetration of low-molecular-weight alcohols into skin. Effect of concentration of alcohol and type of vehicle
Author:
Blank IH
Year:
1964
Bibliographic source:
Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 43(5), 415-420
Reference Type:
secondary source
Title:
No information
Author:
RIFM
Year:
2009
Bibliographic source:
RIFM database
Reference Type:
secondary source
Title:
1-Pentanol
Author:
Rowe VK and McCollister SB
Year:
1982
Bibliographic source:
Patty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, 3rd rev. ed., Wiley, New York, pp. 4527–4708

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline available
Principles of method if other than guideline:
Skin penetration was studied quantitatively using excised human skin.
GLP compliance:
no

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent

Test animals

Species:
human
Sex:
not specified

Administration / exposure

Vehicle:
other: saline, olive oil
Duration of exposure:
no data
Control animals:
yes
Remarks:
other alcohols
Details on study design:
Test:
- human abdominal skin, removed at autopsy within 12 hr of death

Results and discussion

Absorption in different matrices:
As the solubility of the alcohols in nonpolar liquids increases from methanol to octanol, the rate of penetration from an aqueous solution also increases. The alcohols penetrate more rapidly from vehicles in which they are less soluble. The rate of penetration of n-amyl alcohol from saline is about 20 times that of ethanol and about one-ninth that of octanol.

Any other information on results incl. tables

The rate of penetration of n-amyl alcohol from a solution of olive oil does not continue to increase as the concentration becomes high; the rate becomes maximal at given point and thereafter decreases as the concentration continues to rise.

Applicant's summary and conclusion