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Environmental fate & pathways

Biodegradation in water: screening tests

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Description of key information

N,N-dimethylisopropylamine (DMIPA) is considered as not readily biodegradable.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Biodegradation in water:
under test conditions no biodegradation observed

Additional information

The inherent biodegradability of N,N-dimethylisopropylamine (DMIPA) has been evaluated according to OECD 302B guideline using activated sludge taken from a BASF waste water treatment plant treating industrial sewage (study report, 1981). The substance has been found to be not easily eliminated from water since only 29% of degradation (DOC removal) was observed after 28days.

DMIPA can be considered as not inherently biodegradable.

As a supporting study, the readily biodegradability of DMIPA was evaluated according to ISO 7827 (Evaluation in an Aqueous Medium of the "Ultimate" Aerobic Biodegradability of Organic Compounds - Method by Anlaysis of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC)). The substance has been found to be not readily biodegradable with a maximum degradation of 5% obtained after 14 days.

The aerobic degradation of an analogue substance, ethyldiisopropylamine (EDIPA CAS 7087 -68 -5), has also been examined during 28 days according to the OECD guideline 301D and GLP requirements. As DMIPA, EDIPA is characterized by one tertiary amine functional group and alkyl substituents. At test termination, the biodegradation of EDIPA was 2% and thus, similarly to DMIPA, EDIPA was considered as not readily biodegradable.