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Description of key information

No information is available on the toxicokinetics of benzenesulfonic acid, 4-C10-13-sec-alkyl derivs., compds. with 2-propanamine (LAS IPA). The endpoint of toxicokinetics was addressed with data for LAS Na and IPA (see read-across statement). Overall the substance is not expected to have a bioaccumulation potential.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Bioaccumulation potential:
no bioaccumulation potential

Additional information

No information is available on the toxicokinetics of benzenesulfonic acid, 4-C10-13-sec-alkyl derivs., compds. with 2-propanamine (LAS IPA). The endpoint of toxicokinetics was addressed with data for LAS Na and IPA (see read-across statement). Overall the substance is not expected to have a bioaccumulation potential.

IPA:

One study with limited information is available on the toxicokinetics of IPA (Cavender et al., 2000). The study concludes that ingested isopropylamine partly may undergo methyl or N-oxidation. A substantial part is expected to be excreted unchanged in the urine. If oxidative deamination occurs, acetone will be formed. This is usually exhaled as well as excreted into the urine. Small amounts of acetone are normally formed in the intermediary metabolism through spontaneous or enzymatic decarboxylation of acetoacetate. The substance does not show a bioaccumulation potential.

LAS Na:

The absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of LAS (radioactively labeled with 35S) were studied in male Charles River rats. LAS was readily absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract (80-90% of the dose)and rapidly metabolized and excreted in the urine. Most of the absorbed 35S was eliminated within 72 hours and 60-65% of the absorbed dose was eliminated in the urine, 35% of the absorbed 35S was excreted in the bile and was re-absorbed completely from the gastrointestinal tract. Retention of radioactivity was not observed in any organ (Michael, 1968).

The disposition of radioactivity was studied in single and repeated oral or subcutaneous doses of [14C]LAS to rhesus monkeys. Results show that LAS is rapidly absorbed, then rapidly metabolized and excreted, primarily in the urine but also in the bile and feces. No accumulation or localization of radioactivity or change in elimination was observed. LAS does not bioaccumulate in the tissues (Cresswel et al., 1978).

Radiolabelled test substance (3 mM solution) was applied to the shaved skin of female rats. The exposure lasted 15 min, after which is was rinsed off. After a 24 hr observation period during feces, urine, and expired air was collected, the animals were sacrificed and the excised skin was examined by autoradiography. Results show that the test substance, which is of low solubility, did not penetrate through the skin to any significant degree. The amount of test substance penetrating the skin was below the detection limit. The penetration through rat skin was < 0.3% (Howes, 1975a).

Radiolabelled LAS was applied (0.1 ml of a 3 mM solution) to samples of human abdominal skin from four female cadavars. Exposure time was 48 hrs. Analysis by liquid scintillation counting was done at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 24, and 48 hrs. Penetration through human skin was negligible, with < 0.07% absorbed in 48 hrs (Howes, 1975b).