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Toxicological information

Basic toxicokinetics

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
basic toxicokinetics
Type of information:
migrated information: read-across based on grouping of substances (category approach)
Adequacy of study:
key study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Percutaneous absorption of aliphatic compounds.
Author:
Iwata Y, Moriya Y, Kobayashi T
Year:
1987
Bibliographic source:
Cosmet. Toiletries 102(2): 53-68

Materials and methods

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
n-octyl alcohol; n-decyl alcohol, lauryl alcohol and cetyl alcohol all radiolabelled (1-C14) and >98% pure.

Results and discussion

Toxicokinetic / pharmacokinetic studies

Toxicokinetic parametersopen allclose all
Toxicokinetic parameters:
half-life 1st:
Toxicokinetic parameters:
half-life 2nd:
Toxicokinetic parameters:
half-life 3rd:

Any other information on results incl. tables

Distribution results were reported for lauryl alcohol (98% pure). 95% of the dose adminstered was recovered from the application site at 24 hours after 

dosing. 0.13% remained in the body while 0.10% was excreted in the urine and faeces. 2.61% was excreted in expired air as CO2. The ratio of the 

amount of compound excreted via expired air to the amount absorbed is the expiratory excretion rat. It was 91% for lauryl alcohol. The respiratory 

excretion rates for all the other alcohols investigated were >65% although all the actual data is not reported. 

Absorption decreased with increasing carbon chain length. The absorption rate was investigated in different solvents (squalene, castor oil, triethyl 

citrate (TEC). The percutaneous absorption rate of undiluted n-octanol was 50%, this was increased in squalene but decreased in castor oil or 

TEC. This was also reported with the other alcohols tested and the tendency was more pronounced at higher concentrations.

The degree of skin irritation was proportionally related to the degree of  percutaneous absorption.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Interpretation of results (migrated information): no bioaccumulation potential based on study results
Following skin application of lauryl alcohol about 2.84 % of the administered dose was absorbed. Of this absorbed dose >90% was excreted in expired air (CO2). A similar trend was observed with the other alcohols tested. Absorption decreased with increasing carbon chain length and was affected by solvent and concentration.