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Physical & Chemical properties

Surface tension

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
surface tension
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
other information
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: see 'Remark'
Remarks:
This review article contains a collection of data which were chosen using specific selection criteria such as amount of data available, methodology, etc. as well as an estimation of the reliablity. Thus we consider it a Klimisch 2g (reliable with restriction: collection of data)

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
review article or handbook
Title:
The surface tension of pure liquid compounds
Author:
Jasper J.J.
Year:
1972
Bibliographic source:
Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data, 1(4): 841-1009

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
spontaneous rise in a capillary tube over a wide temperature range
GLP compliance:
not specified
Type of method:
other: capillary rise A

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
No data available

Results and discussion

Any other information on results incl. tables

Table showing the surface tension of benzoyl chloride at different temperatures

Temperature (°C) Surface tension (mN/m)
10 40.26
20 39.17
30 38.09
40 37.00
50 35.92
60 34.84
70 33.75
80 32.67
90 31.58
100 30.50
110 29.42
120 28.33
130 27.25
140 26.16
150 25.08
160 24.00

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
The surface tension of benzoyl chloride at 20 °C is 39.17 mN/m
Executive summary:

This review article reports the surface tension of benzoyl chloride using a collection of data which were chosen using specific selection criteria such as amount of data available, methodology, etc. as well as an estimation of the reliablity. Surface tension values are given from 10°C till 160°C in steps of 10°C and range from 40.26 mN/m (10°C) till 24.00 mN/m (160°C). The surface tesnion of the test substance at 20 °C is 39.17mN/m.

Since the review article is based on carefully chosen data, we consider it a Klimisch 2g (reliable with restriction: collection of data)