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Physical & Chemical properties

Vapour pressure

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Endpoint:
vapour pressure
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
weight of evidence
Study period:
1989
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: data from authoritative peer-reviewed database and handbook
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
other: no data
Temp.:
ca. 25 °C
Vapour pressure:
ca. 19.3 mm Hg
Remarks on result:
other: extrapolated value
Conclusions:
The vapor pressure of VOCl3 is extrapolated at 19.3 mm Hg (25°C)
Endpoint:
vapour pressure
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
weight of evidence
Study period:
1999
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: data from reliable handbook
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
other: no data
Temp.:
ca. 26.6 °C
Vapour pressure:
20 mm Hg
Conclusions:
The vapor pressure of VOCl3 is 20 mmHg at 26,6 °C
Endpoint:
vapour pressure
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
weight of evidence
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: data from authoritative database
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
other: no data
Temp.:
ca. 20 °C
Vapour pressure:
ca. 8.1 mBar
Conclusions:
The vapor pressure of VOCl3 is 8.1 mBar at 20°C

Description of key information

According to two reliable data, the vapor pressure of VOCl3 is indicated to be 19.3 mmHg at 25°C and 20 mmHg at 26,6 °C.

Under environmental conditions, only vanadium element is retrieved in water compartment, under form of vanadyl ion (4+) in reducing conditions, and under vanadate ion (5+) in oxidative conditions. For environment risk assessment, for other compartments the vanadium element data are reported as key values. Very few metal compounds (e.g., mercury-compounds, AsH 3 and stibine) volatilization has to be considered under normal environmental conditions. Most metal compounds however, are not volatile at ambient temperatures and this low volatilization potential is incorporated in exposure models by setting the Henry-coefficient to a very low value.  In such cases, most of the metal present in the atmosphere is predominantly bound to form aerosols, which means that rates of dry and wet deposition (in combination with the scavenging ratio) of atmospheric aerosols will quantify transport from the atmosphere (exceptions: Hg and Se). Therefore, an extremely low value for the vapour pressure is there reported as key value. (EUSES guidance indicates for example 10E-20 Pa)

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Vapour pressure:
0 Pa
at the temperature of:
25 °C

Additional information