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Basic toxicokinetics

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
basic toxicokinetics in vivo
Type of information:
read-across based on grouping of substances (category approach)
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
From January 06, 2004 to November 17, 2005
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study with acceptable restrictions
Remarks:
- Study was conducted according to the OECD 417 and in compliance with GLP with some acceptable deviations. However, the dermal application part suffered from design limitations, allowing for oral uptake from the skin after the 6h exposure, and therefore invalidating the results obtained for dermal uptake.
Justification for type of information:
Refer to the Quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) category or section 13 of IUCLID for details on the category justification.

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
study report
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
2006
Report Date:
2006

Materials and methods

Objective of study:
toxicokinetics
Test guideline
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 417 (Toxicokinetics)
Deviations:
yes
Remarks:
see any other information on materials and methods incl. tables section
GLP compliance:
yes (incl. certificate)

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Type:
Constituent
Type:
Constituent
Type:
Constituent
Type:
Constituent
Type:
Constituent
Type:
Constituent
Test material form:
solid
Radiolabelling:
yes

Test animals

Species:
rat
Strain:
Sprague-Dawley
Sex:
male/female
Details on test animals and environmental conditions:
-Species: Sprague-Dawley rats
-Strain: Crl CD® (SD) IGS BR
-Source: Charles River Laboratories France, L’Arbresle, France. Caesarean Obtained, Barrier Sustained-Virus Antibody Free (COBS-VAF®).
-Sex: 60 males and 60 females.
-Age/weight at study initiation: Young adults approximately 7 week old; for the bile collection group, animals were around 10 week old.
-Number of animals per group: Kinetics (5 groups): 9 males and 9 females (3/group/time/sex); Excretion balance: (3 groups): 5 males and 5 females
Bile collection (1 group): 4 males and 4 females
-Control animals: Yes: For the purposes of pre-dose sample analysis, plasma, blood and tissues will be collected from at least one untreated supplementary animal/sex using the above mentioned procedures.

Administration / exposure

Route of administration:
other: Oral by gavage and dermal
Vehicle:
water
Details on exposure:
-Specific activity of test substance 2.15 MBq/mg test item (58.2 µCi/mg)
-Volume applied: Oral: 10 mL/kg; Dermal: 1.5 mL/kg bw on approximately 10% body surface area (approximately 12 µL/cm2)
-Size of test site: Dermal: approximately 10% body surface area: 25 cm2 for 200 g rat, 30 cm2 for 250 g rat.
-Exposure period: Dermal: Treated area washed after 6 h.
-Sampling time: PK - oral: (3 animals/sex/group) post-gavage
⋅ first sampling set: 0.5, 4 and 24 h,
⋅ second sampling: 1, 8 and 48 h,
⋅ third sampling set: 2, 72 and 96 h.
PK - dermal (after initiation of skin contact):
⋅ first sampling set: 3, 8 and 24 h,
⋅ second sampling: 6, 10 and 48 h,
⋅ third sampling set: 7, 16 and 72 h.
MB oral and dermal:
Urine and faeces: 24 h before radioactive treatment, and during the periods 0-24, 24-48, 48-72, 72-96, 96-120, 120-144 and 144-168 h after the radioactive gavage/dermal application.
Bile collection: 0-3, 3-6, 6-12 and 12-24 h post gavage.

-Samples: Blood/plasma, urine, faeces, bile, exhaled air, organs, carcass, skin with substance not removable, liquid used for washing the skin, protective appliances.

- Preparation of the site: The hair of the administration site was clipped (using electric clippers) the day before dosing.
Duration and frequency of treatment / exposure:
6 h
Doses / concentrations
Dose / conc.:
50 mg/kg bw/day (nominal)
Remarks:
Doses / Concentrations:
Males and females: Single and repeated oral low dose level: 50 mg/kg bw (for PK TD, MB and bile (single exposure)); high dose oral: 200 mg/kg bw (PK and TD); single dermal low dose: 1.5 mg/kg bw (for PK, TD and MB); high dose dermal: 15 mg/kg bw (for PK and TD).
PK= Pharmacokinetics; TK= Tissue distribution; MB = Mass balance
No. of animals per sex per dose:
60 males and 60 females with the below split:
Kinetics (5 groups): 9 males & 9 females (3 /group/time/sex)
Excretion balance: (3 groups): 5 males & 5 females
Bile collection (1 group): 4 males & 4 females
Control animals:
yes, concurrent no treatment
Details on study design:
For details kindly refes to the attached background material section of the IUCLID.
Details on dosing and sampling:
See 'Any other information on materials and methods incl. tables'.

Results and discussion

Main ADME results
Type:
other: Absorption, distribution and excretion

Toxicokinetic / pharmacokinetic studies

Details on absorption:
Dose: Radiochemical purity (99.5%) is sufficient (>98% ; OECD guidance), and formulated material was relevant in relation to possible human exposure: Concentrations for dermal application were 0.1 and 1% for 6h. This is based on already avaibale information on irritancy levels of the test substance: 4h, 5% on rabbit skin is mildly irritating; 24h occluded patches with 0.1% concentrations in water produced a well defined erythema and very slight oedema.

The oral high dose of 200 mg a.i./kg bw could possibly lead to some toxic effects, as the acute LD50 by gavage is between 250 and 450 mg a.i./kg bw.

Recovery: Total recovery for oral groups were suffficient with around 100% except for males of repeated dose group resulting to 95.3% recovery. For dermal groups, total recovery was slightly low (87.2% males and 91.0% females). However, it should be remarked that probably the total radioactivity in the carcass samples with an avarage of about 5% was too low, as for all 4 animals for which no seperate internal organs were measured, total carcass levels were about 10%, compared to 1 to 3% for the 6 animals for which radioactivity in individual oragns were measured.

Oral absorption:
Most of the radioactivity were excreted via the faeces. About 3-4% left via urine, except for the males in the repeated dose groups showing a mean value of 8.31%. However, soft faeces were also observed in this group during the days of collection, possibly causing contamination of urine with faeces.
Also corresponding with high cage wash values. Elimination was quick, with 70-80% excreted within the first 24h. No radioactivity was left in the carcass. Bile examinations show that 4.58% (males) and 3.75% (females) of the total dose was recovered in the bile. Elimination was quick, with 25-30% already passed out in the bile in the 0-3 h period. The mean plasma and blood levels for males and females remained below quantifiable limits at all time points, except in the 50 mg/kg dose group for 0.5 to 2h time points for plasma (161 and 251 ng -eq/g for males at 1 and 2h respectively, and 109 ng-eq/g at 0.5 h, 212 ng-eq/g at 1h and 192 ng-eq/g at 2 h for females), and in blood only the 1 h time point in females (173 ng-eq/g). No plasma or blood levels could be determined for the 200 mg/kg dose group or the repeated 50 mg/kg dose group.

Following single oral gavage at a nominal dose-level of 50 mg/kg bw to rats of group 1, the mean radioactivity levels were below quantifiable limits in all tissues/organs at all time-points, except for the intestines and liver. Specifically, levels for males/females were 23.3/23.2% of the dose for the intestines and 0.087/0.039% of the dose for the liver at the 24h time-point. Levels decreased over time, and were all non-quantifiable by 168h.

Following single oral gavage at a nominal dose level of 200 mg/kg bw to rats of group 2, the mean radioactivity levels were above quantifiable limits in approximately half the analysed tissues and organs at 24 h. Specifically, high levels were present in the intestines (62.2/71.5% of the dose) for males/females, and trace levels were present in the abdominal fat, heart, kidneys, liver, lungs, lymph nodes and or pancreas (range 0.004 to 0.24% of the dose). As previous, levels decreased over time, and were all non-quantifiable by 96h with the exception of the intestines.

Following repeated oral gavage at a nominal dose-level of 50 mg/kg bw to rats of group 5, the mean radioactivity levels were below quantifiable limits in all tissues/organs, except for the intestines (e.g. levels for males/females of 15.9/36.9% of the dose at 24h) and the liver in males (0.072% of the dose at 24 h). Levels decreased over time and were non-quantifiable by 168h.

Dermal absorption:
The minimal percutaneous absorption (Faeces, urine and intestines) seemed to amount to 46.4% for males, and 47.4% for females. The maximum systemic absorption (faeces, urine, carcass and skin site) was 50.0% and 50.1% for males and females respectively. The data indicate that the skin application site is a reservoir for absorbed radioactivity in the animals. As the dermal application site was not protected from grooming after the 6h exposure period, test substance remained available on the skin for subsequent oral uptake from grooming.

Test substance was uniformly distributed in the stratum corneum. Cross-contamination to adjacent skin was observed. The mean plasma and blood levels for males and females for 1.5 mg/kg dose group remained below quantifiable limits at all time points, except for the 7 and 8 h time-points for blood (levels for males/females of 3.52/4.40 and 2.67/3.26 ng-eq/g, respectively). For the 15 mg/kg bw dose group only the 8 (levels of 70.2/68.6 ng-eq/g for males/females) and 24 (levels of 62.3/55.0 ng-eq/g for males/females) h time-points resulted in values above the quantifiable limits.

Following single dermal application at a nominal dose-level of 1.5 mg/kg to rats of group 3 and 15 mg/kg to rats of group 4, the mean radioactivity levels were below quantifiable limits in all tissues/organs at all time-points except for the intestines, "stripped" skin fiom the application site and adjacent site. Trace levels were found at 24 and 48h time-points in the eyes of the 1.5 mg/kg bw dose group.
Details on distribution in tissues:
See above for details.

Metabolite characterisation studies

Metabolites identified:
no
Details on metabolites:
The radioactivity excreted in the urine was not associated with the parent compound, but metabolites formed were not identified.

Any other information on results incl. tables

Toxic effects and clinical signs:

No test substance-related mortality or morbidity were observed during the study. The only death observed (Male D28768, group 9, single oral dose at 50 mg/kg bw), was an isolated incident and not seen at the higher dose-level of 200 mg/kg bw, was considered to be due to complications following the bile duct cannulation. In terms of clinical signs, ptyalism was seen in 1/9 males and 1/9 females of group 5 from Day 6 (repeat oral dose of 50 mg/kg bw) and soft faeces were noted in 4/5 males of group 8 from Day 6 (also, repeat oral dose of 50 mg/kg bw). As the ptyalism was of low incidence and is often seen in rats treated orally, this was not considered to be test substance-related. In contrast, as of high incidence, the soft faeces were considered to be due to the repeated test substance treatment. No dermal irritation occurred.

Dermal irritation: No effects

Recover of labelled compound (Mass balance (Group 6, 7 & 8)):

Oral:Following single or repeated oral gavage of the isotopic test item mixture at a nominal 50 mgkg/day to rats, the mean (+/- standard deviation) total cumulative excretion of the radioactive dose for males/females over a 168-hour period in urine, feces and cage wash was complete at 100.3 +/-2.2/101.4 +/- 7.2% for the single dose group 6 and 95.3 +/- 5.7/101.2 +/- 2.1% for the repeated dose group 8.

Dermal:Overall, the absolute total recovery of radioactivity was slightly low at 87.2 ± 2.9% for males and 91.0 ± 1.8% for females; in view of the homogeneity of the data, the low absolute total recovery of radioactivity was of unknown cause, but may have been due to poor estimation of the applied radioactive dose or poor recovery of radioactivity from the site wash materials. Losses of radioactivity as14CO2are considered to be unlikely in view of the correct mass balance obtained for the oralroute.

Conclusion:

-Oral application: 
Following single and/or repeated oral gavage at 50 and 200 mg/kg bw/day, the plasma, blood and organ radioactivity levels were essentially non-quantifiable indicating a low oral bioavailability. The actual fraction of the oral dose absorbed was about 8% (urine and bile fractions); this was eliminated rapidly, essentially within a 48 to 72h period. The vast majority of the oral dose was excreted rapidly in the faeces. At the high oral dose-level only, quantifiable levels of radioactivity were found in some central organs at 8h post-dosing; otherwise, the vast majority of the dose was confined to the intestine and levels decreased over time. Only 0.62 to 8.15% of the oral
dose was eliminated in the bile in a 24h period.

-Dermal application:
Following single dermal application at 1.5 and 15 mg/kg bw, the plasma and blood radioactivity levels were non-quantifiable at nearly all time-points. For the 1.5 mg/kg bw group, around 2% and 43% of the dose was eliminated in the urine and faeces, respectively, mostly within a 48h period, suggesting that the dermal dose was highly absorbed via the skin. However, as the test site was not protected with an Elizabethan collar during the main part of the collection
period (the collar was worn during the 6h exposure period only), this may have been due to the animal licking the test site. This is also supported with the finding that after oral dosing only about 4% was excreted via bile back to intestines, and 4% excreted via urine. If similar routes of excretion are expected for dermal absorbed doses, it would not be possible to find levels of 50% of applied doses in intestines with only 2% excreted via urine. This indicates that about 50% of the dermal applied dose was taken up orally after all, which following the same oral kinetics leads to the 2% excretion in urine as indeed was observed.

At 24 h post-dosing, most of the radioactivity was in the "stripped" skin (dermis/epidermis) application site (15.02/8.74% [male/female] and 33.8/24.2% of the dose for the high and low dose groups respectively) and intestine for both dose-levels (5.76/8.32% and 5.61/7.79% of the dose for the high and low dose groups respectively), though some radioactivity was in the skin adjacent to the application site and minor traces were in the eyes (both most likely from
cross-contamination due to grooming). At 168 h, levels in the application site of the individual animals of the low dose were 5.19 to 9.21% of the radioactive dose, suggesting the skin acted as a drug reservoir. In the stratum corneum of the application site, the levels of radioactivity were of similar magnitude in the different layers at each time-point. For all tissues/organs, the radioactivity levels essentially decreased over time.

- All data showed low inter-animal variability. In addition, there was no evidence of gender differences.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Under the conditions of the study and following oral administration the test substance was found to have limited absorption (ca. 10%), low distribution (below quantification limits within 4-7 d) and majorly excreted via faeces (ca. 80%). The results following dermal application are considered to be invalid, as the experiment suffered from design flaws, allowing for oral uptake from the skin after the 6 h exposure period.
Executive summary:

A study was conducted to determine the basic toxicokinetics of the read across substance, C12-16 ADBAC (49.9% active in water, 99.4% radiolabelled purity), according to OECD Guideline 417, in compliance with GLP. In this study, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with single and repeated oral doses (50 or 200 mg/kg bw) as well as a single dermal dose (1.5 or 15 mg/kg bw) of the radiolabelled read across substance. Following single and/or repeated oral doses, the plasma, blood and organ radioactivity levels were essentially non-quantifiable, indicating a low oral bioavailability. The actual fraction of the oral dose absorbed was around 8% (urine and bile fractions). This was eliminated rapidly, essentially within a 48 to 72 h period. The majority of the oral dose was excreted in the faeces. At the high oral dose level only, quantifiable levels of radioactivity (2,386 to 23,442 ηg equivalent/g) were found in some central organs at 8 h post-dosing; otherwise, the vast majority of the dose was confined to the intestines, where their levels decreased over time and were all non-quantifiable by 168 h (i.e., 7 d). Only about 4% of the oral dose was eliminated in the bile in a 24 h period, of which about 30% during the first 3 h. Following a single dermal application, the plasma and blood radioactivity levels were non-quantifiable at nearly all time-points. For the 1.5 mg/kg bw group, around 2 and 43% of the dose was eliminated in the urine and faeces, respectively, mostly within a 48-h period, suggesting that the dermal dose was highly absorbed via the skin. However, this apparent high absorption via the skin may have been due to the animal licking the test site. This is also supported with the finding that, after oral dosing, only about 4% was excreted via bile back to the intestine and 4% excreted via urine. If similar routes of excretion are expected for dermally absorbed doses, it would not be possible to find levels of 50% of applied doses in intestine with only 2% excreted via urine. This indicates that about 50% of the dermally applied dose was taken up orally after all. According to the same oral kinetics, this leads to the 2% excretion in urine as indeed was observed. At 24 h post-dosing, most of the radioactivity was in the “stripped” skin (dermis/epidermis) application site (15.02/8.74% [male/female] and 33.8/24.2% of the dose for the high and low dose groups respectively) and intestines for both dose levels (5.76/8.32% and 5.61/7.79% of the dose for the high and low dose groups respectively), though some radioactivity was in the skin adjacent to the application site and minor traces were in the eyes (both most likely from cross-contamination due to grooming). At 168 h, levels in the application site of the individual animals of the low dose were 5.19 to 9.21% of the radioactive dose, suggesting the skin acted as a drug reservoir. In the stratum corneum of the application site, the levels of radioactivity were of similar magnitude in the different layers at each time-point. For all tissues/organs, the radioactivity levels decreased over time. All data showed generally a low inter-animal variability. In addition, there was no evidence of gender differences. Under the conditions of the study and following oral administration the read across substance was found to have limited absorption (ca. 10%), low distribution (below quantification limits within 4-7 d) and majorly excreted via faeces (ca. 80%). The results following dermal application are considered to be invalid, as the experiment suffered from design flaws, allowing for oral uptake from the skin after the 6 h exposure period (Appelqvist, 2006).