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Environmental fate & pathways

Bioaccumulation: terrestrial

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Description of key information

Data have been obtained from secondary source.
Some loss of dinitrophenols from soil could also occur by plant uptake. The bioaccumulation factor (concentration in plant over concentration in soil) in lettuce, carrot (tops, peels, and root), hot pepper foliage, and fruits was <0.01 at a soil pH of 6.7-7.2, at concentrations likely to cause maximum bioaccumulation (10 mg/kg).
The uptake and translocation in plants could be significant in soil with low pH where the concentration of non-ionized dinitrophenols (more readily adsorbed than the ionized form) are higher.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

BCF (terrestrial species):
0.01 dimensionless

Additional information

Some loss of dinitrophenols from soil could occur by plant uptake. At concentrations likely to cause maximum bioaccumulation (10 mg/kg), the bioaccumulation factor (concentration in plant over concentration in soil) in lettuce, carrot (tops, peels, and root), hot pepper foliage, and fruits was <0.01 at a soil pH of 6.7-7.2. Since dinitrophenols undergo metabolism in plants, plant accumulation of dinitrophenols due to uptake would not be significant. Since the concentration of the non-ionized form is only <0.25% of total DNP at pH 6.7, the soil pH has to be considerably lower for uptake to be significant in plants (O’Connor GA, Lujan JR, Jin Y. 1990) In fact, the uptake and translocation in plants could be significant in soil with low pH where the concentration of non-ionized dinitrophenols (more readily adsorbed than the ionized form) are higher (Shea PJ, Weber JB, Overcash MR. 1983).