Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Hazard for aquatic organisms

Freshwater

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Marine water

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

STP

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Sediment (freshwater)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Sediment (marine water)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for air

Air

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Soil

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for predators

Secondary poisoning

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no potential for bioaccumulation

Additional information

No adverse effects to fish, daphnia or aquatic plants were observed in acute tests. MMB is inherently biodegradable and has a low log Kow (0.18) so long term exposure to or bioaccumalation in aquatic organisms is not expected.

Although the acute 96hr LC50 for fish is reported as >100 mg/L and that for Daphnia is >1000 mg/L, it is not reasonable to say that fish are more sensitive than daphnia since no mortality was observed in either study at the highest dose tested. Therefore, EPISUITE QSAR Model ECOSAR was used to evaluate the predicted toxicity to fish at higher doses. The predicted 96 hr LC50 fish was 2081mg/L and 48 hr EC50 daphnia was predicted as 934mg/L. Regardless of which aquatic ecotoxicity value is applied (>100, >1000, 2081, or 934 mg/L), the substance is not classified as hazardous to the environment.

One reliable toxicity test to microorganisms is available. In this test no respiration inhibiton of MMB was observed at a limit concentration of 1000 mg/L. An EC50 >1000 mg/L was calculated.

Conclusion on classification

MMB is inherently ultimately biodegradable and has no potential for bioaccumulation and adsorption to organic matter (Koc). According to Annex I of the CLP regulation 1272/2008/EC, no classification is required, as all EC50 are greater than 100 mg/L.