Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Hazard for aquatic organisms

Freshwater

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no data: aquatic toxicity unlikely

Marine water

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no data: aquatic toxicity unlikely

STP

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no data: aquatic toxicity unlikely

Sediment (freshwater)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
insufficient hazard data available (further information necessary)

Sediment (marine water)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
insufficient hazard data available (further information necessary)

Hazard for air

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Soil

Hazard assessment conclusion:
insufficient hazard data available (further information necessary)

Hazard for predators

Secondary poisoning

Hazard assessment conclusion:
insufficient hazard data available (further information necessary)

Additional information

Conclusion on classification

The nickel slag is a complex metal containing substance. It mainly contains iron silicate and silicates of aluminum and calcium. Traces of metals exist in metal, mineral form or included in silicate phases.

The toxicity of the UVCB substance is related to the degree to which the metal constituents react with water / biological fluids and release soluble, potentially bio available ionic and other metal bearing species.

The environmental classification of the nickel slag is derived on the basis of Transformation /dissolution data and knowledge of corresponding toxicity for the various metal species in accordance to the EU hazard classification system for metal and metal compound (as described in the guidance Annex IV to EU CLP regulation EC No 1272/2008)

The Arche CLP tool was used to automatically calculate the classification of the UVCB substance. The tool incorporates the eco toxicity data for all constituents relevant for classification.

For that purpose the eco toxicity data expressed as metal ions (ex µg Ni/L) are compared to metal ions released (ex µg Ni/L) during the transformation/dissolution (T/D) tests. Transformation/dissolution test (Rodrigues, 2010) was performed on typical nickel slag sample Sampling and sample preparation was performed according to ECI/REACH C2 Sampling Protocol.

The T/D tests were done at pH 6 and compared to toxicity data at pH 6 (from Arche tool).

The toxicity of all dissolved concentrations of all constituents was taken into account.This was obtained by using the Toxic Unit (TU) approach (Sprague, 1970, Anderson and Weber,1975) for multi component metal solutions. 

Dissolved concentrations of metals to the OECD media after 7 d days transformation/dissolution at pH 6 at a loading rate of 100 mg/L were significantly low: Ni 0.6μg/l. For all other metals values below detection limit were recorded.

The approach applied assessment of the ecotoxicological profile of typical nickel slag and additional read across to all nickel slags across industry.

Reliable acute/short term toxicity data are available for the three trophic levels (algae, Daphnia and fish) of the analogue substance copper slag. These studies show that the lowest L(E) C50 is >100 mg/l . A reliable chronic toxicity study onBrachionus calyciforus (rotifer) shows 48 h EC10 for copper slag of 94 mg/l.

Toxicity test data for the analogue substance demonstrate that Acute 1 Chronic 1 classifictaion is not applicable for copper slag.Furthermore acute toxicity studies for the analogue substance demonstrate that there is no need to classify copper slag for any acute category. Based on read across no classifictain is predicted for the target substance - nickel slag.

Assessment based on transformation/dissolution data and toxi unit approach of the nickel slag lead to No classification

Consequently the data demonstrate that there is no need to classify nickel slag for acute and chronic effects.

A detailed summary of the classification and is attached